Paul Reid Photographer 
 
 

Searching all stock for "man":

Transport (9 files)

20120530Buick12PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's.

Pic shows one of one of Buick's early cars with his chief engineer Walter L. Marr on the left and Buick's son Thomas D. Buick on the right 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 1PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 2PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 5PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's.

Pic shows Ian Lamb standing in Green Street, Arbroath where David Dunbar Buick came from. The Green Street Hall in the background has a plaque in honour of Buick. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 6aPR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 6PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 7PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb who is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 9aPR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's.

Pic shows the memorial plaque for David Dunbar Buick which is fitted on the side of the Green Street Hall 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,
20120530Buick 9PR 
 $ Arbroath man Ian Lamb is campaigning to have statue erected in honour of Arbroath's David Dunbar Buick the founder of the Buick Motor Company in the USA at the beginning of the 1900's.

Pic shows Green Street, Arbroath in the 1950s where David Dunbar Buick was born (half way down street on the left). The Green Street Hall(with chimneys) still stands today and now has a plaque in honour of Buick. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, Buick, 1900, car, USA, America, David Dunbar Green Street, statue,

No specific category (10 files)

20151103SpaceMarinePR-1 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' in Steves lounge.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-10 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's Seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-2 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.Shopper Mary Martin passes by
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-3 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time. Shopper Mary Martin passes by.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-4 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-5 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-6 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-7 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time. A crowd gathers to check out the model.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-8 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.Steve with his creation.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction
20151103SpaceMarinePR-9 
 Arbroath man Steve Wild's seven and a half foot self built 'Space Marine' on an outing in Arbroath for the first time.Steve pictured with his creation.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2015, soace, marine, model, tall, fun, fugure, science fiction

Military (12 files)

Not marines
20130915MiniSub 33PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 34PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with a gifted, special edition, x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 35PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre ..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 36PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 37PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre ..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 38PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 1PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 2PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 3PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 4PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 5PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 6PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland

Military > Not Royal Marines (4 files)

Images of and pertaining to the armed forces. Royal Marines have their own collection
8561137 copy 
 A Sea King helicopter of 202 Squadron RAF on a rescue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath.

Picture shows casualty being treated after winching

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, medical, oxygen, RNLI, Lossiemouth, 202 Squadron, D Flight, winching
8561143 copy 
 A Sea King helicopter of 202 Squadron RAF on a rescue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath.

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, Lossiemouth, Sea, King
8561151 copy 
 A Sea King helicopter on 202 Squadron Royal Air Force on a recsue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath, Angus.

Casualty and crewman seen being winched with Coastguard rescue team below.

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, 202, squadron, D Flight, Lossiemouth, winching, winchman, coastguard
8561165 copy 
 A Sea King helicopter on 202 Squadron Royal Air Force on a recsue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath, Angus.

Casualty and crewman seen being winched with Coastguard rescue team below.

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, 202, squadron, D Flight, Lossiemouth, winching, winchman, coastguard

Education, Medical and Research (2 files)

Images from schools, universities, medical and research establishments
8194870 
 Aberdeen based Air Ambulance . Janice Jack - Neonatal Transport Sister from the Princes Royal Maternity Hospital caring for a baby during the journey from Isle of Man to hospital in Liverpool, 
 Keywords: Air Ambulance Janice Jack neonatal transport Sister, Princes Royal Maternity Hospital baby
8194883 
 Aberdeen based Air Ambulance . Janice Jack - Neonatal Transport Sister from the Princes Royal Maternity Hospital caring for a baby during the journey from Isle of Man to hospital in Liverpool, 
 Keywords: Air Ambulance Janice Jack neonatal transport Sister, Princes Royal Maternity Hospital baby

Industry and Commerce > Agriculture Fisheries and Food (7 files)

0058ArbroathPR 
 Man repairing lobster pots at Arbroath Harbour. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour lobster repair Scotland pots
0085 
 Man repairing lobster pots at Arbroath Harbour. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour lobster repair Scotland pots
0110 
 Man with lobster pots barrow at Arbroath Harbour 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour lobster repair Scotland pots
0111 
 Man with lobster pots barrow at Arbroath Harbour. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour lobster repair Scotland pots
8194799 
 Man with lobster pots barrow at Arbroath Harbour. New creels going to the boat 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour, sea, water, boats, fishing, lobster, net, repair, barrow, Angus, Scotland, creels, pots
8194803 
 Man with lobster pots barrow at Arbroath Harbour. 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour, sea, water, boats, fishing, lobster, net, repair, barrow, Angus, Scotland
8608344 
 Large flock of sheep gathered in pens for transportation from the Isle of Lewis in Scotland 
 Keywords: NIALL, BENVIE, SHEEP, GATHERING, FANK, TRANSPORTATION, ISLE, OF, LEWIS, SCOTLAND, DOMESTICATED, OVIS, ARIES, EUROPE, OUTER, HEBRIDES, WESTERN, ISLES, LEWIS, FARM, ANIMAL, MAMMAL, MAN, MADE, STRUCTURE, HORIZONTAL CONFINED, TOGETHER, PACKED, PENNED, DENSE, CLOSE, BELOW, CONTAINED, CONTROLLED, COOL, BLUE, MALE, FEMALE, ADULT, MANY, UPLAND, HILL, GRAZING, MANAGEMENT, MOORLAND, 2004, SEPTEMBER, SUMMER, MORNING, SHADOWS, ISLAND, ECONOMY, WOOL

Industry and Commerce > Agriculture Fisheries and Food > Arbroath Smokies (open collection)

Images of Arbroath smokies and their manufacture and marketing

GV General Views > Marine and Coastal (7 files)

Images at sea and on the coastal fringe including harbours. Fishing images are under industry
20090909Arbroath 4PR 
 Arbroath man having a smoke at the end of Shore Street, Arbroath with the Seaton Cliffs in the background as the sun sets in the seaside town...Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Arbroath, Angus, Scotland, Seaton Cliffs, cliffs, smoking, smoke, sunset, sea, coast
20140611EastHaven 1PR 
 BBC's Beechgrove Garden's Jim NcColl pays a visit to the East Haven 800 garden.
Pic shows Garden landscape Designer Karen Laing(facing) chatting to local man Hugh Scott(in boat)who has transformed an old abandoned boat.

Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, East Haven 800, East haven, fishing, community, village, coast, coastal, Carnoustie, Arbroath, 800, boat, garden, landscape, Hugh Scott, Jim McColl, Wendy Murray, Karen Laing, landscape designer
8195247 
 Man repairing lobster pots at Arbroath Harbour. Yacht under sail 
 Keywords: Arbroath, harbour, sea, water, boats, fishing, lobster, net, repair
8561137 
 A Sea King helicopter of 202 Squadron RAF on a rescue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath.

Picture shows casualty being treated after winching

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, medical, oxygen, RNLI, Lossiemouth, 202 Squadron, D Flight, winching
8561143 
 A Sea King helicopter of 202 Squadron RAF on a rescue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath.

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, Lossiemouth, Sea, King
8561151 
 A Sea King helicopter on 202 Squadron Royal Air Force on a recsue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath, Angus.

Casualty and crewman seen being winched with Coastguard rescue team below.

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, 202, squadron, D Flight, Lossiemouth, winching, winchman, coastguard
8561165 
 A Sea King helicopter on 202 Squadron Royal Air Force on a recsue mission when a man falls from the cliffs at Arbroath, Angus.

Casualty and crewman seen being winched with Coastguard rescue team below.

D Flight 202 Squadron is based at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray 
 Keywords: rescue, RAF, helicopter, cliff, Arbroath, Angus, sea, coast, 202, squadron, D Flight, Lossiemouth, winching, winchman, coastguard

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views (7 files)

Images made in towns and cities and images of specific buildings
20141125East Haven Rail Hut 1PR 
 Old railway linesmans hut and land for sale ...transport literally at your back door............The hut is situated at the ancient fishing village of East haven between Arbroath and Carnoustie. The hamlet historically consisted of two rows of cottages Long Row and Shore Row the latter being cut off from the sea when the railway line was built in between the two. The Arbroath to Dundee railway opened the station at East Haven in 1838 and closed it in in 1967. East Haven is one of the earliest recorded fishing communities in Scotland dating back to 1214. 
The hut and land owned by Carnoustie man Ian Burns are for sale for £8000. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, East Have, rail, railway, linesman, accomodation, sale, coast, Arbroath, Dundee, carnoustie, hut, building, land, property
20141125East Haven Rail Hut PR-5 
 Old railway linesmans hut and land for sale ...transport literally at your back door............The hut is situated at the ancient fishing village of East haven between Arbroath and Carnoustie. The hamlet historically consisted of two rows of cottages Long Row and Shore Row the latter being cut off from the sea when the railway line was built in between the two. The Arbroath to Dundee railway opened the station at East Haven in 1838 and closed it in in 1967. East Haven is one of the earliest recorded fishing communities in Scotland dating back to 1214. 
The hut and land owned by Carnoustie man Ian Burns are for sale for £8000. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, East Have, rail, railway, linesman, accomodation, sale, coast, Arbroath, Dundee, carnoustie, hut, building, land, property
3Montrose PR

AN Angus Council project to bring one of the most beautiful gardens in Scotland back to life has come to fruition.
A six year project has seen £1.8m invested in the historic Montrose Mid Links to restore them to their Victorian splendour.
The nine garden parks run parallel to the High Street and form an integral part of the Montrose townscape. 
They are a tribute to Victorian philanthropy and vision, and in particular the foresight of one man George Scott, who created the gardens in the late 19th century.
His imagination turned what was a quagmire in winter and a dust bowl in summer into a series of elegant gardens which runs the length of Montrose Town Centre.
Picture shows descendants of George Scott strolling around the parks. 
 Keywords: montrose park mid link
8834011 
 REGENERATED MID LINKS OFFICIALLY OPENED IN MONTROSE.
AN Angus Council project to bring one of the most beautiful gardens in Scotland back to life has come to fruition.
A six year project has seen £1.8m invested in the historic Montrose Mid Links to restore them to their Victorian splendour.
The nine garden parks run parallel to the High Street and form an integral part of the Montrose townscape. 
They are a tribute to Victorian philanthropy and vision, and in particular the foresight of one man George Scott, who created the gardens in the late 19th century.
His imagination turned what was a quagmire in winter and a dust bowl in summer into a series of elegant gardens which runs the length of Montrose Town Centre.
Picture shows four year old Montrose lad Robbie Paton having fun as locals admire a new sculture.
. 
 Keywords: mid, links, gardens, park, george, scott, 19th, century, montrose, high, street, sculpture
8834057 
 REGENERATED MID LINKS OFFICIALLY OPENED IN MONTROSE.
AN Angus Council project to bring one of the most beautiful gardens in Scotland back to life has come to fruition.
A six year project has seen £1.8m invested in the historic Montrose Mid Links to restore them to their Victorian splendour.
The nine garden parks run parallel to the High Street and form an integral part of the Montrose townscape. 
They are a tribute to Victorian philanthropy and vision, and in particular the foresight of one man George Scott, who created the gardens in the late 19th century.
His imagination turned what was a quagmire in winter and a dust bowl in summer into a series of elegant gardens which runs the length of Montrose Town Centre.
Picture shows four year old Montrose lad Robbie Paton having fun as locals admire a new sculture.
. 
 Keywords: mid, links, gardens, park, george, scott, 19th, century, montrose, high, street, sculpture
8834224 
 REGENERATED MID LINKS OFFICIALLY OPENED IN MONTROSE.
AN Angus Council project to bring one of the most beautiful gardens in Scotland back to life has come to fruition.
A six year project has seen £1.8m invested in the historic Montrose Mid Links to restore them to their Victorian splendour.
The nine garden parks run parallel to the High Street and form an integral part of the Montrose townscape. 
They are a tribute to Victorian philanthropy and vision, and in particular the foresight of one man George Scott, who created the gardens in the late 19th century.
His imagination turned what was a quagmire in winter and a dust bowl in summer into a series of elegant gardens which runs the length of Montrose Town Centre.

. 
 Keywords: mid, links, gardens, park, george, scott, 19th, century, montrose, high, street, sculpture
8834249 
 REGENERATED MID LINKS OFFICIALLY OPENED IN MONTROSE.
AN Angus Council project to bring one of the most beautiful gardens in Scotland back to life has come to fruition.
A six year project has seen £1.8m invested in the historic Montrose Mid Links to restore them to their Victorian splendour.
The nine garden parks run parallel to the High Street and form an integral part of the Montrose townscape. 
They are a tribute to Victorian philanthropy and vision, and in particular the foresight of one man George Scott, who created the gardens in the late 19th century.
His imagination turned what was a quagmire in winter and a dust bowl in summer into a series of elegant gardens which runs the length of Montrose Town Centre.
Picture shows four year old Montrose lad Robbie Paton having fun as locals admire a new sculture.
. 
 Keywords: mid, links, gardens, park, george, scott, 19th, century, montrose, high, street, sculpture

Arts and Entertainment > Performing arts (4 files)

Images of performers and performances in theatre and concert hall - classical, contemporary and pop
10649950 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him. 
 Keywords: Tweedy circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo fringe festival
10649963 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him. 
 Keywords: Tweedy clown circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo theatre fringe
10649977 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him.

Alan, a former pupil at Dyce Academy in Aberdeen left his home city at the age of 16 to be a clown, has won numerous awards after spells with circuses and theatre productions. He made the headlines after marrying the circus trapeeze artist and even had his daughter Willow christened in the big top. 
 Keywords: Tweedy clown circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo theatre fringe
10650014 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him.

Alan, a former pupil at Dyce Academy in Aberdeen left his home city at the age of 16 to be a clown, has won numerous awards after spells with circuses and theatre productions. He made the headlines after marrying the circus trapeeze artist and even had his daughter Willow christened in the big top. 
 Keywords: Tweedy clown circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo theatre fringe festival

Arts and Entertainment > Literature and Visual Arts (4 files)

Artists, authors, painting, sculpture, exhibitions, antiques, books, poetry and libraries
20040116ArbroathPR 
 Arbroath man Pete Edwards who recreated Arbroath Abbey in his living room. 
 Keywords: arbroath abbey model living room
7454006 
 Arbroath man, Pete Edwards, who has recreated Arbroath Abbey in his living room. 
 Keywords: arbroath, abbey, living, room
7454050 
 Arbroath man, Pete Edwards, who has recreated Arbroath Abbey in his living room. 
 Keywords: arbroath, abbey, living, room
7454140 
 Arbroath man, Pete Edwards, who has recreated Arbroath Abbey in his living room. 
 Keywords: arbroath, abbey, living, room

Arts and Entertainment > Performing arts (4 files)

Images of performers and performances in theatre and concert hall - classical, contemporary and pop
10649950 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him. 
 Keywords: Tweedy circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo fringe festival
10649963 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him. 
 Keywords: Tweedy clown circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo theatre fringe
10649977 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him.

Alan, a former pupil at Dyce Academy in Aberdeen left his home city at the age of 16 to be a clown, has won numerous awards after spells with circuses and theatre productions. He made the headlines after marrying the circus trapeeze artist and even had his daughter Willow christened in the big top. 
 Keywords: Tweedy clown circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo theatre fringe
10650014 
 Alan Digweed - Tweedy the clown - who is performing his one man show at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Tweedy's "Lost Property" is a comedy about a clown who gives in to society and gets a real job. His new employment is set in a lost property office where he tries and fails to control a constantly ringing telephone but is prevented due to the wilful antics of the lost property which appears to come to life , even Tweedy's own body goes against him.

Alan, a former pupil at Dyce Academy in Aberdeen left his home city at the age of 16 to be a clown, has won numerous awards after spells with circuses and theatre productions. He made the headlines after marrying the circus trapeeze artist and even had his daughter Willow christened in the big top. 
 Keywords: Tweedy clown circus Aberdeen Dyce Alan Digweed Zippo theatre fringe festival

Nature and Wildlife (1 file)

Includes domestic and wild animals and country and farming themes
20040616Crow6PR 
 Albino Crow found in Dundee by local man Dudley Kay. Dudley feeding the youngster by hand 
 Keywords: albino, crow, feed,

Nature and Wildlife > Balinasloe Horse Fair (2 files)

Images from the well known Irish horse fair
7245679 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland.

A real Irish horse man enjoys the fair. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, face, smoking, cap, man
7245682 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A man says goodbye to his horse as he reluctantly waits for a buyer. The dark bay seems to be as sad as him. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, face, man, dark bay, calm, friendship, sad

Sport football (3 files)

Scottish Football
20091107Aberdeen6PR 
 Aberdeen vs St Johnstone
Aberdeen's man of the match Peter Pawlett takes on Grainger and Morrison
.pics paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2009, St Johnstone, football, Scotland, Aberdeen
20180414DundeeUtd10 PR 
 Dundee Utd vs Falkirk...Bilei Mohsni man of the match thumbs up at full time..pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Dundee Utd;Falkirk;2018;;football;Scottish;Bilei Mohsni
Dundee17PR 
 Dundee vs Kilmarnock
Kilmarnock manager Kenny Shiels not a happy man as he shouts at the ref after he failed to give a 2nd half penalty as Chris Johnston went down in the box after a Iain Davidson challenge
Pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2013, Dundee, Kilmarnock, football, Kenny Shiels, manager

Arbroath (2 files)

0058ArbroathPR 
 Man repairing lobstor pots at Arbroath Harbour, Angus, Scotland 
 Keywords: Arbroath harbour sea fishing lobster net repair creel pot
7227251 
 Man walking dog by Arbroath Harbour at dusk 
 Keywords: arbroath, harbour, harbor, dusk, man, dog

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