Paul Reid Photographer 
 
 

Searching all stock for "death":

No specific category (21 files)

15428551 
 Police team searching Arbroath beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. The police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, head, hand
15428565 
 Police team searching Arbroath beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. The police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, head, hand
15428578 
 Police team searching Arbroath beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. The police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, head, hand
15428607 
 Police team searching Arbroath beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. The police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, head, hand
15428616 
 Police team searching Arbroath beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. The police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, head, hand
15428622 
 Police team searching Arbroath beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. The police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, head, hand
15428649 
 A young family close to the exact spot on Arbroath Beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. Police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, parts, head, family
15428658 
 A young family close to the exact spot on Arbroath Beach where two young sisters found a woman's head in a plastic bag. Police later found both hands 
 Keywords: Paul, Reid, Arbroath, Angus, Pictures, 2008, body, death, police, search, beach, parts, head, family
15444793 
 Forensic experts at the flat in Brechin belonging to a woman whos body parts were found on a Arbroath beach 13 miles away 
 Keywords: 2008, Angus, Arbroath, beach, body, death, hand, head, Paul, Pictures, police, Reid, search, Tayside Police, forensic, Brechin, flat
15444845 
 Forensic experts at the flat in Brechin belonging to a woman whos body parts were found on a Arbroath beach 13 miles away 
 Keywords: 2008, Angus, Arbroath, beach, body, death, hand, head, Paul, Pictures, police, Reid, search, Tayside Police, forensic, Brechin, flat
20040703BamsePR 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose today to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog 'Bamse' who led a dedicated life looking after sailors in & around war time in Dundee & Montrose Picture shows Harriett the St Bernard in front of members of the Nowegian Navy as a piper plays a lament during the Memorial Service today. 
 Keywords: Bamse, dog, St Bernard, hero, Norway, Montrose, Glaxo, al, Angus, grave, memorial
20100416Witch2aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 1aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 2aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 3aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 4aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 5aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 6aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s.
Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by.

.Pic shows passers-by looking at the memorial in position

Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures....see story Kurt Bayer/Scottish News Agency 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 7aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s.
Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by.

Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Angus, 2010, witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 8aPR

Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
7451409 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog,Bamse, who led a dedicated life looking after sailors in & around war time Dundee & Montrose . The dog's grave is situated next to the GlaxoSmithKline perimeter fence in Montrose and is visited regularly. Picture shows Harriett the St Bernard in front of members of the Nowegian Navy as a piper plays a lament during the Memorial Service. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, norwegian, navy, st, bernard

Military (12 files)

Not marines
20130915MiniSub 33PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 34PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with a gifted, special edition, x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 35PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre ..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 36PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 37PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre ..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 38PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 1PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 2PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 3PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 4PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 5PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 6PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland

Military > Not Royal Marines (2 files)

Images of and pertaining to the armed forces. Royal Marines have their own collection
7245304 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog 'Bamse' who led a dedicated life by looking after sailors in & around war time in Dundee & Montrose. The dogs grave is situated next to the GlaxoSmithKline perimeter fence in Montrose and is visited regularly where passers by lay stones. 
 Keywords: Bamse, dog, St Bernard, hero, Norway, Norwegian, World, War, second, 2, sailor, navy, honour, Montrose, Glaxo, hat, save, rescue, animal, Angus, grave, memorial
7247307 copy 
 Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose Resident Expert on militaria & Collectables David Pirie with Royal Highlanders Black Watch Corporal James McLennan's Death Plaque which was given to families of soldiers after the death of the soldier 
 Keywords: Royal, highlanders, black, watch, death, plaque, auction, taylors

GV General Views > Rural and Scenic views (9 files)

Calendar and postcard type images mainly of the countryside. Some farming pictures, but most are in industry
20100416Witch2aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 1aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 2aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 3aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 4aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 5aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 6aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s.
Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by.

.Pic shows passers-by looking at the memorial in position

Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures....see story Kurt Bayer/Scottish News Agency 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 7aPR 
 Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s.
Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by.

Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Angus, 2010, witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin
20100416Witch 8aPR

Forfar couple commission memorial stone for the innocent woman of Forfar who were killed for being witches in the late 1600s. Mark and Marie Carshley who live alongside Forfar Loch in Angus asked Brechin sculptor Tom Church to make the stone for them which they have placed at the foot of their garden so that walkers can see it as they pass by. 
 Keywords: witch, death, stone, memorial, Carshley, Tom Church, Forfar, Brechin

Arts and Entertainment (19 files)

All aspects of the arts and the entertainment industry
20170404Glamis 10PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;2017;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;art;carving;Angus
20170404Glamis 11PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Rob Neith Nicholson;Kim Neith Thompson;2017;carving;Angus;art
20170404Glamis 12PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid
Pic shows head gardener Des Cotton(left) with Neith Art artist Rob Neith Nicholson
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;2017;carving;sculpture;Rob Neith Nicholson;Des Cotton
20170404Glamis 13PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration

Pic shows Neith Art artist Rob Neith Nicholson with his creation
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Rob Neith Nicholson;carving;2017;Angus;sculpture
20170404Glamis 14PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration

Pic shows Neith Art artist Rob Neith Nicholson.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017
20170404Glamis 15PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;carving;2017;sculpture
20170404Glamis 16PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration

Pic shows visitors Wendy Slater, Natalie Lorenzen and Anna-Lena Kuhn admiring the witches.
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Angus;2017;carving;sculpture
20170404Glamis 17PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 18PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017;Angus;carving;sculpture
20170404Glamis 19PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017;carving;Angus;sculpture
20170404Glamis 1PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017;carving;sculpture
20170404Glamis 2PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017;carving;sculpture
20170404Glamis 3PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017;sculpture;Angus;carving
20170404Glamis 4PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Angus;sculpture;carving;2017Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson
20170404Glamis 5PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration.
Pic shows Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson working on the 4th figure King Duncan.
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;2017;Angus;sculpture;Kim Neith Thompson
20170404Glamis 6PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
Pic shows sculptor Kim Neith Thompson on a break from working on the 4th figure King Malcolm.
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;2017;sculpture;figure;Angus
20170404Glamis 7PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;carving;2017;sculpture;Angus
20170404Glamis 8PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;sculpture;art;Angus;2017
20170404Glamis 9PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art's Kim Neith Thompson and Rob Neith Nicholson carried out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilize centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeares play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Kim Neith Thompson;Rob Neith Nicholson;art;carving;sculpture

Arts and Entertainment > Literature and Visual Arts (1 file)

Artists, authors, painting, sculpture, exhibitions, antiques, books, poetry and libraries
7247307 
 Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose Resident Expert on militaria & Collectables David Pirie with Royal Highlanders Black Watch Corporal James McLennan's Death Plaque which was given to families of soldiers after the death of the soldier 
 Keywords: Royal, highlanders, black, watch, death, plaque, auction, taylors

Nature and Wildlife (19 files)

Includes domestic and wild animals and country and farming themes
20170404Glamis 10PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 11PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 12PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration.
Pic shows head gardener Des Cotton(left) with Neith Art artist Rob Neith Nicholson
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 13PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration.
Pic shows Neith Art artist Rob Neith Nicholson with his creation
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 14PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration.
Pic shows Neith Art artist Rob Neith Nicholson.pic Paul Reid
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;Rob Neith Nicholson;2017
20170404Glamis 15PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 16PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration.
Pic shows visitors Wendy Slater, Natalie Lorenzen and Anna-Lena Kuhn admiring the witches.
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 17PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 18PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 19PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 1PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 2PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 3PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 4PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 5PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration.
Pic shows Leith Art's Kim Neith Thompson working on the 4th figure King Duncan.
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 6PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
Pic shows sculptor Kim Neith Thompson on a break from working on the 4th figure King Malcolm.
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 7PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 8PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;
20170404Glamis 9PR 
 The witches of Macbeth, huddled around their cauldron in front of Glamis Castle, Angus... the figures are carved from wood felled in the grounds of the castle.
Yorkshire-based Neith Art are carrying out the Glamis commission, based at the castle, and head gardener Des Cotton said the project would utilise centuries-old timber from some of the magnificent trees in the grounds.
The Angus castle is home to the eponymous character in Shakespeare’s play, and the witches are the first in what is planned to be a series of carved sculptures from the famous work, using wood from some of the mighty fallen trees on Strathmore estate the will be positioned on a Macbeth trail.
The castle pinetum was planted by the 13th Earl of Strathmore around 1870 with a variety of exotic trees, many of them conifers native to North America.

Following difficulties in maintaining the pinetum after the death of the 14th Earl in 1944, the 18th Earl – Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, who passed away in February 2016 – commenced a programme of replanting and restoration
.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Glamis;witches;Macbeth;wood;wooden;carved;castle;Glamis Castle;pinetum;trail;Strathmore;estate;castle;Neith Art;

Sport football (1 file)

Scottish Football
20140503Dundee 3PR 
 Dundee vs Dumbarton
Dumbarton come close to equalising at the death which would have given the league to Hamilton Accies
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Dundee, Dumbarton

Arbroath (5 files)

20110927ArbroathDeath 1PR 
 Keywords: Angus, Arbroath, murder, death, police, Culloden Road, forensic
20110927ArbroathDeath 2PR 
 Keywords: Angus, Arbroath, murder, death, police, Culloden Road, forensic
20110927ArbroathDeath 3PR 
 Murder at Culloden Road Arbroath
Forensic investigaors leaving the flat (centre right) 
 Keywords: Angus, Arbroath, murder, death, police, Culloden Road, forensic
20110927ArbroathDeath 4PR 
 Keywords: Angus, Arbroath, murder, death, police, Culloden Road, forensic
20110927ArbroathDeath 5PR 
 Keywords: Angus, Arbroath, murder, death, police, Culloden Road, forensic

Glamis (11 files)

Glamis Castle, village and the Strathmore family. The Queen Mother was brought up here
20160229Glamis2PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his treasured Bentley at Glamis Castle....the Bentley had a specially made crest for the bonnet in the form of a Glamis lion.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death
20160229Glamis 10PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows Earl of Strathmore's Bentley which had a specially made crest for the bonnet in the form of a Glamis lion.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death, Mary Pamela, car, bentley
20160229Glamis 1PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his treasured Bentley at Glamis Castle....the Bentley had a specially made crest for the bonnet in the form of a Glamis lion.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death
20160229Glamis 3PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his treasured Bentley at Glamis Castle....the Bentley had a specially made crest for the bonnet in the form of a Glamis lion.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death
20160229Glamis 5PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his treasured Bentley at Glamis Castle....the Bentley had a specially made crest for the bonnet in the form of a Glamis lion.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death, car, bentley
20160229Glamis 6PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his mother Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore and his treasured Bentley at Glamis Castle....the Bentley had a specially made crest for the bonnet in the form of a Glamis lion.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death, Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore, car, bentley
20160229Glamis 7PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his mother Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore in the italian Garden at Glamis Castle.....
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death, Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore, garden, Italian Garden
20160229Glamis 8PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his mother Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore in the italian Garden at Glamis Castle.....
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death, Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore, garden, Italian Garden
20160229Glamis 9PR 
 The 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, Michael Fergus Bowes-Lyon, has died after a long illness. He was 58.
The former Scots Guards captain was born on June 7 1957, the Queen’s first cousin once removed and great-nephew to the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.
Pic shows the Earl of Strathmore with his mother Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore in the italian Garden at Glamis Castle.....
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, Glamis, Glamis Castle, Earlo of Strathmore, Lord Strathmore, royal, Queen, Strahmore, castle, death, Mary Pamela, Dowager Countess of Strathmore, garden, Italian Garden
8195176 
 Glamis Church graveyard, Glamis. Headstone carved with stylistic angel, an hour glass and other symbols with an inscription to death and eternity 
 Keywords: Glamis, Glamis Church, gravestone, angel, stone, death, eternity, hour, glass
8195177 
 Glamis Church graveyard, Glamis. Headstone carved with stylistic angel and inscription to death and eternity 
 Keywords: Glamis, Glamis Church, gravestone, angel, stone, death, eternity

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