Paul Reid Photographer 
 
 

Searching all stock for "war":

Transport (6 files)

20140627BubbleCar 1PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 2PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 3PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 4PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 5PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 6PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car

No specific category (8 files)

20040703BamsePR 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose today to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog 'Bamse' who led a dedicated life looking after sailors in & around war time in Dundee & Montrose Picture shows Harriett the St Bernard in front of members of the Nowegian Navy as a piper plays a lament during the Memorial Service today. 
 Keywords: Bamse, dog, St Bernard, hero, Norway, Montrose, Glaxo, al, Angus, grave, memorial
20050302BannockburnPR 
 Statue at Bannockburn battlefield near Stirling. 
 Keywords: Stirling, Bannockburn, Statue, Scotland battlefield war independence robert bruce
20140622ForfarGala 2PR 
 Forfar Gala day...
Tug O War competition...Kiera McKinnon has a giggle as one of her team slips at a crucial time. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Forfar Gala day, Forfar, festival, event, fun, Tug O War, rope, competition
7451409 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog,Bamse, who led a dedicated life looking after sailors in & around war time Dundee & Montrose . The dog's grave is situated next to the GlaxoSmithKline perimeter fence in Montrose and is visited regularly. Picture shows Harriett the St Bernard in front of members of the Nowegian Navy as a piper plays a lament during the Memorial Service. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, norwegian, navy, st, bernard
7451494 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised 50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, norwegian, navy
7455601 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised 50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7455603 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised 50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7457648 
 Henny King fundraiser for Bamze the dog memorial in Montrose. with a latter day Bamse. 
 Keywords: norwegian, navy, sailors, second, world, war

Military (80 files)

Not marines
20130915Kylesku PR-1-2 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-1-3 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the Kylesku bridge...there was no bridge when the x craft left from here on their missin from left to right
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub, bridge
20130915Kylesku PR-1 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-2 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows detail from the memorial
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-3 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows detail on the memorial 
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-4 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915MiniSub 10aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Lt John Lorimer on board shipe with the crew of the X6 .....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 10bPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows .Lt John Lorimer on board shipo with the the crew of the X6 ....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 10PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the crew of the X6 ...Lt John Lorimer ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 11PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer marrying his wife and Nayvy wren Judith in Ayr two days after receiving his DSO medal at Buckingham Palace...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 12PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer marrying his wife and Nayvy wren Judith in Ayr two days after receiving his DSO medal at Buckingham Palace...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 13PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic press cuttings...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 14PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows press cutting...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 15aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the reverse side of X craft hero John Lorimer's medal gifted to him by the German sailors personel who were on board tirpitz when the ship was attacked by Lorimer and his colleagues ......... Silver medal 1984 Germany Medal in commemoration 1944 Fight in the Arctic Sea. Battlestar Tirpitz ..pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 15PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer's medal gifted to him by the German sailors personel who were on board tirpitz when the ship was attacked by Lorimer and his colleagues ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 16PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows a sketch by Commanding Officer Lt Donald Cameron from Carluke who was given a VC gifted to John Lorimer at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire.
Pic shows the X6 being left behind by the towing submarine before the attack, charging batteries by winding a dyanamo in the dark with the Tirpitz lit up in the background and finally The terpitz(left) with the X6 sub's periscope inthe foreground
...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 17PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows a sketch by Commanding Officer Cameron who was given a VC gifted to John Lorimer at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire.
Pic shows the view on approaching the Tirpitz, the sub crew being captured before the x6 sub sank after dropping their explosives and the explosion 1 hour later....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 19PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer on board the Trepitz after his arrest ..pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 1aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(91) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 1PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 27PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 28PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 29PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 2PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 30PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 31PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 32PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 33PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 34PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with a gifted, special edition, x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 35PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre ..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 36PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 37PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre ..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 38PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre..Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915MiniSub 3PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 4PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 5PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire with his collection of medals including his DSO medal(left)..Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 6PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire with his collection of medals including his DSO medal(left)..Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 7PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer's(91) DSO medal.Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 8PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(91) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 9PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the crew of the X6 ....LT Wilson- (passage crew commanding officer), commanding officer Lt. Donald Cameron(crew), Lt. John Lorimer(crew), 
Front row Lt. R. Kendall(crew), and Engine Room Artificer Ednund Goddard(crew);Leading Seaman McGregor(passage crew) and Stoker Oxley(passenger crew) ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915 Bergius 1PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 2PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 3PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 4PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 5PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130915 Bergius 6PR 
 X Craft 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the Japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

See following story published in Hensburgh Heritage by Donald Fullarton

A VERY well-known Shandon man was a hero of midget submarines in World War Two and was named in the best selling book ‘Above Us The Waves’.

Now retired and living in Glenbarr, near Tarbert, on the west coast of the Kintyre peninsula, Adam Bergius carved a successful career in the whisky business and was the first chairman of Lomond School.

During his daring wartime exploits with the 12th Flotilla he was awarded a DSC for his gallantry, and some years ago he spoke of the memorable day when he cut an underwater communication cable in the Far East.

He swam out along the ocean bed from a tiny five-man ‘X Craft’ submarine, a top secret midget craft operating from the mother ship Clan Davidson.

His task was to cut communication between Japanese-held Hong Kong and Saigon.

The war in the Far East was coming to a close when orders came that the all-important cable had to be cut.

Sub-Lieutenant Bergius, then aged 20, and Sub-Lieutenant K.M.Briggs were towed in submarine XE4, commanded by Lieutenant Max Shean, DSO, RNVR, to the mouth of the Saigon River.

Their orders were to cut two cables — the Singapore-Saigon, and the Hong Kong-Saigon — to force the Japanese to use wireless communications which could be intercepted and deciphered.

Despite the dangerous depths of water in which the cables lay, the two officers pressed home their attack with the knowledge that earlier this depth of water had been responsible for the deaths of two other divers.

The XE4 was towed into the river by the submarine Spearhead, and slipped her tow at 9.20pm on July 30. She was away from the parent ship until the early hours of August 1.

Dragging a grapnel and chain weighing about 80lbs along the sea bed, the midget sub made a number of runs before being brought up suddenly as the grapnel caught the Singapore cable.

Sub-Lt Briggs was first to leave the submarine and returned with a short length of cable as evidence of a job well done.

The Hong Kong cable was found about an hour later by Lt Shean. Adam Bergius left the craft for his attempt, but had trouble with his cutting gear and returned. The difficulty ironed out, he left again shortly after.

He recalled: “The cable lay about 40 feet from where our submarine had come to rest. The water was a bit muddier than Loch Striven where we had done our training, but I didn’t have much difficulty in finding the cable.

“We had been told to bring back a piece of the cable as proof that it had been well and truly cut. I still have that piece as a souvenir.”

The divers were specially commended for working in much deeper and therefore more dangerous water than had been expected.

Only a short time before, two highly trained divers had lost their lives in attempting to cut telephone cables in the same depth of water.

“Underwater breathing apparatus was in its infancy at that time,” he said.

“Since that time there had been great progress made in the breathing of pure oxygen. Skin diving, for instance, is a typical example of the progress made.”

Mr Bergius first served as a rating, then was appointed Midshipman RNVR in November 1943 and promoted to Sub-Lieutenant in March 1945.

After the war the former Kelvinside Academy pupil rose to become chairman of whisky firm Wm Teacher and Son Ltd., and he wrote a book called ‘Make Your Own Scotch Whisky’ in which he provided a spoof recipe.

He was the first Commodore of Helensburgh Sailing Club, and he was closely involved in the merger of St Bride’s School for girls and Larchfield boys preparatory school to form Lomond School, taking the chair in the early years of the new school.

He and his wife Fiona, who died in February 2011, had five children of their own.

The mother ship Clan Davidson — named HMS Bonaventure during the war — was laid up in the Gareloch for a time after the war and was then repurchased by the Clan Line.

She was fitted out to carry 12 passengers and became the first Clan Line ship to carry passengers to South Africa for 50 years. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, midget submarine, mini craft, x craft, sub, mini sub, submarine, sea, veteran, Japanese, Mekong Delta, war, military, Adam Bergius, Tarbert, Argyle, Kintyre, Scotland
20130922Kylesku 100PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 101PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 102PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 103PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 104PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius(left) and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 105PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Stefano Manucci Command Warrant Officer Submarines with X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 106PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Stefano Manucci Command Warrant Officer Submarines with X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Stefano Manucci, Command Warrant Officer, Submarines
20130922Kylesku 107PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius(left) and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 108PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the loch next to the memorial where the subs headed out from on their way to Norway 
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 109PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Willie Elliott at the ceremony...Willie witnessed watched as a boy
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Willie Elliott
20130922Kylesku 110PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Willie Elliott at the ceremony...Willie witnessed watched as a boy
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Willie Elliott
20130922Kylesku 111PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the bridge at Kylesku which wasn't there when the mini-subs headed along from left to right and out to sea and Norway.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, bridge, road
20130922Kylesku 112PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors John Lorimer(left) and Adam Bergius at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 113aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the last post being played at the ceremony with the loch behind which the mini-subs had headed along on their way to Norway
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 93PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 94PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 95PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 96aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) (2nd from left)at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 96PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 97PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) laying a wreath next to the memorial at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 98aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 98PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony after laying a wreath next to the memorial at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 99PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony looking out at the loch and route the subs headed from for Norway
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-1 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-10 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...
Royal Marine laying a wreath at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-11 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-12 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-2 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-4 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...Royal Marines...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-5 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-6 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-7 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-9 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...
Royal Marine laying a wreath at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-9a 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...
Royal Marine laying a wreath at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath

Military > Not Royal Marines (32 files)

Images of and pertaining to the armed forces. Royal Marines have their own collection
20060531black watch0025PR 
 Black Watch Memorial at Powrie Brae near Dundee 
 Keywords: soldier, memorial, war, statue, Dundee, Black, watch, kilt
20080723Lockart 1PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guard George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20080723Lockart 2PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guard George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20080723Lockart 3PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guards George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20080723Lockart 4PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guard George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20080723Lockart 5PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guard George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20080723Lockart 6PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guard George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20080723Lockart 7PR 
 ACT OF DEDICATION & REMEMBRANCE AT ARBROATH WAR MEMORIAL

Former serving and serving members attended the dedication and remembrance in memory of Scots Guard George Lockhart who was shot in the back by an I.R.A. sniper while on patrol in the Brandywell area of Londonderry at 17:30 on 23rd of September, 1972. George died of his wounds on the 26th of September.

Two vetran Scotsguards at George's recently added Memorial plaque.

. 
 Keywords: George Lockart Scots Guards memorial service miltary, Arbroath war memorial Northern Ireland
20171208Military1 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show Herbert Walkingshaw.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military10 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show Herbert Walkingshw.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military11 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic shows Walkinshaw's ship Adrias with the bow blown off(right) .pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military2 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic shows Autioneer and valuer Geoffrey Taylor with some of the set of items up for auction.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military3 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show Autioneer and valuer Geoffrey Taylor with some of the set of items up for auction.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military4 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show Autioneer and valuer Geoffrey Taylor with some of the set of items up for auction.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military5 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show Autioneer and valuer Geoffrey Taylor with some of the set of items up for auction.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military6 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show Autioneer and valuer Geoffrey Taylor with some of the set of items up for auction.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military7 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic show some of the set of items up for auction.pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military8 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic shows some of the set of items up for auction including his OBE (left).pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
20171208Military9 
 Military artefacts belonging to Glaswegian World War 2 captain Herbert Walkinshaw who among other things managed to continue sailing his ship 'Adrias' mine despite the bow being blown away after hitting a mine. ..Walkinshaw was given the OBE and a Greek medal as well as a earning a host of medals during his service. Walkinshaw was presented with the freedom of Glasgow. ....the sale will take place at Taylors Auction Rooms later this month.

Pic shows Herbert Walkingshaw after the war .pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Auction;Montrose;Angus;Herbert Walkinshaw;Walkinshaw;navy;Naval;military;medals;2017;Glasgow
7245204 
 Black Watch Memorial at Powrie Brae near Dundee.

The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS) is an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Prior to 28 March 2006, The Black Watch was an infantry regiment in its own right; The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) from 1931 to 2006, and The Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch) before 1931. 
 Keywords: soldier, memorial, war, statue, field, Dundee, Black, watch, Black Watch, Scotland, remember, kilt
7245304 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog 'Bamse' who led a dedicated life by looking after sailors in & around war time in Dundee & Montrose. The dogs grave is situated next to the GlaxoSmithKline perimeter fence in Montrose and is visited regularly where passers by lay stones. 
 Keywords: Bamse, dog, St Bernard, hero, Norway, Norwegian, World, War, second, 2, sailor, navy, honour, Montrose, Glaxo, hat, save, rescue, animal, Angus, grave, memorial
7455584 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7455668 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7456830 
 84 year old Mrs Margaret Gablonski who has returned from Australia after 60 years to revisit Montrose Air Station where she was based in 1943 during the war, where she met her pilot husband Sergeant Edward Gablonski. Margaret is pictured in the Air Station Museum with personal pictures of the couples' time there.

Operated by the Montrose Aerodrome Heritage Society and Montrose Air Station Heritage Trust, the museum tells of the historic Scottish aerodrome, which first opened in 1913 
 Keywords: Margaret, Gablonski, Montrose, Station, air, raf, rfc, museum, aerodrome, heritage, society
7457210 
 84 year old Mrs Margaret Gablonski who has returned from Australia after 60 years to revisit Montrose Air Station where she was based in 1943 during the war, where she met her pilot husband Sergeant Edward Gablonski. Margaret is pictured outside Air Station Museum 
 Keywords: Margaret Gablonski, Montrose, Air Station, air, force, RAF, AFC, RFC, 1943
7457216 
 84 year old Mrs Margaret Gablonski has returned from Australia after 60 years to revisit Montrose Air Station where she was based in 1943 during the war, where she met her pilot husband Sergeant Edward Gablonski. Picture shows Margaret and husband as they were then. 
 Keywords: Margaret Gablonski, Montrose, Air Station, air, force, RAF, AFC, RFC, 1943
7457222 
 84 year old Mrs Margaret Gablonski who has returned from Australia after 60 years to revisit Montrose Air Station where she was based in 1943 during the war, where she met her pilot husband Sergeant Edward Gablonski. Margaret is pictured with her portrait in the Air Station Museum with more personal photographs behind her of the couples stay 
 Keywords: Margaret, Gablonski, Montrose, Air, Station, museum, australia, visitor, revisit, 60 years
7457230 
 D Day War Hero Orlando Gallacio at home in Brechin 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second, 6th, June 1944, veteran
7457241 
 D Day War veteran. Orlando Gallacio from Brechin took part in the D Day landings. 
 Keywords: world, war, II, two, second, Normandy, France, D Day
7457248 
 D Day War Hero, Orlando Gallacio from Brechin(right) pictured just after arriving in Normandy as he meets up with Forfar Photographer Alex Laing (left) 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second,
7457256 
 D Day War Hero Orlando Gallacio at home in Brechin 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second, 6th, June 1944, veteran
7457275 
 D Day War Hero Orlando Gallacio at home in Brechin 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second, 6th, June 1944, veteran

Military > Royal Marines (9 files)

Images of and pertaining to the Royal Marines particularly, but not exclusively, 45 Commando and Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-1 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-5 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-6 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-7 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-9 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...
Royal Marine laying a wreath at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
20141109RemembranceArbroath PR-9a 
 Arbroath Remembrance Sunday ...
Royal Marine laying a wreath at the Cenetaph...pics Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, 2014, Arbroath Remembrance Sunday, war, service, Arbroath
9515819 
 45 Commando Group(1982) Service of Remembrance and Thanksgiving at RM Condor Arbroath in memory of the marines who lost their lives during the Falklands War in 1982.

A relative lays a wreath at the memorial plaque. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Marine, Angus, Arbroath, Condor, Military, service, memorial, remembrabce, Falkland, war, 1982, RM Condor
9515838 
 45 Commando Group(1982) Service of Remembrance and Thanksgiving at RM Condor Arbroath in memory of the marines who lost their lives during the Falklands War in 1982.

Lt Col Duncan Dewar with his wife Helen and children Ben & Lottie 
 Keywords: Scotland, Marine, Angus, Arbroath, Condor, memorial, remembrabce, Falkland, war, 1982
9515862 
 45 Commando Group(1982) Service of Remembrance and Thanksgiving at RM Condor Arbroath in memory of the marines who lost their lives during the Falklands War in 1982. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Marine, Angus, Arbroath, Condor, memorial, remembrabce, Falkland, war, 1982

GV General Views (16 files)

20140515Watson-Watt10PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt11PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott next to his sculpture
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows the Sir Robert Watson-Watt staue at Powderhall Foundry in Edinburgh....pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt13PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after arrival
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt14PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after being lowered into place
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt15PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt1PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt21PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture
20140515Watson-Watt2PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt3PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin......pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt4PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt6PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt7PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt8PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott in front of his statue
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt9PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt 20PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture

GV General Views > Marine and Coastal (2 files)

Images at sea and on the coastal fringe including harbours. Fishing images are under industry
20160301Corbie Knowe 7PR 
 Informal collection of holiday huts and caravans at Corbie Knowe situated at the southern end of Lunan Bay between Arbroath and Montrose, Angus.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, hut, caravan, Corbie Knowe, coast, coastal, sea, Lunan Bay, Arbroath, Montrose, Angus, hut, shed, war, wartime, bunker, lookout, building, defence, beach, sand
20160301Corbie Knowe 9PR 
 Informal collection of holiday huts and caravans at Corbie Knowe situated at the southern end of Lunan Bay between Arbroath and Montrose, Angus.
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2016, hut, caravan, Corbie Knowe, coast, coastal, sea, Lunan Bay, Arbroath, Montrose, Angus, hut, shed, war, wartime, bunker, lookout, building, defence, beach

GV General Views > Rural and Scenic views (5 files)

Calendar and postcard type images mainly of the countryside. Some farming pictures, but most are in industry
20100404Easthaven1 
 A cow next to an old wartime building and now an agricultural store on a farm near Easthaven near Arbroath 
 Keywords: Westhaven, Carnoustie, cow, farm, building, war, Arbroath,
20100404Easthaven2 
 A cow next to an old wartime building and now an agricultural store on a farm near Easthaven near Arbroath 
 Keywords: Westhaven, Carnoustie, cow, farm, building, war, Arbroath,
7227191 
 Old ruins near Findochty,Aberdeenshire.

Findochty (pronounced 'Finechty') stands on the shores of the Moray Firth. With its painted cottages, a scenic harbour overlooked at the west by the local war memorial, and at the east by the white painted Church of Scotland, Findochty is a jewel of the north east of Scotland. 
 Keywords: findochty, moray, firth, fishing, villge, ruins
7245162 
 A tourist photographing a Robert the Bruce Statue at Stirling Castle with the Wallace Monument in the distance and the southern end of the Grampian Mountains in the background.
Stirling was a strategic "choke point" in the wars of independence of the 13th and 14th centuries being one of the few places that the River Forth could be crossed. The two great Scottish heros are commorated at and near Stirling Castle 
 Keywords: Stirling, Castle, statue, Robert the Bruce, William Wallace, photograph, tourist, grampian, forth
7245354 
 Bannockburn near Stirling. A statue of the King at the site of the 1314 battle between King Robert of Scotland and Edward II of England.

The battle of Bannockburn was undoubtedly of one of the most spectacular battles of the Scottish Wars of Independence. Although the struggle against the English was to continue for some 13 years more, the Scottish victory was of enormous importance as it secured the future of the throne for Robert Bruce, King of Scots. 
 Keywords: Stirling, Bannockburn, Statue, Sculpture, History, Scotland, battle, king, robert

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views (43 files)

Images made in towns and cities and images of specific buildings
20070921DundeeLaw1PR 
 Dundee Law with its war memorial 
 Keywords: Dundee Law, tayside, Memorial, extinct Volcano, Scotland, hill
20070921DundeeLaw2PR 
 Dundee Law with its war memorial 
 Keywords: Dundee Law, tayside, Memorial, extinct Volcano, Scotland, hill
20070921DundeeLaw3PR 
 Dundee Law with its war memorial 
 Keywords: Dundee Law, tayside, Memorial, extinct Volcano, Scotland, hill
20100514Arbroath1PR 
 Western Cemetery Arbroath. The Mortuary building is much admired piece of architecture. The cemetery contains war graves from both world wars. 
 Keywords: scotland arbroath cemetery war grave mortuary building sandstone
20100514Arbroath2PR 
 Western Cemetery Arbroath. The Mortuary building is much admired piece of architecture. The cemetery contains war graves from both world wars. 
 Keywords: scotland arbroath cemetery war grave mortuary building sandstone
20100514Arbroath3PR 
 Western Cemetery Arbroath. The Mortuary building is much admired piece of architecture. The cemetery contains war graves from both world wars. 
 Keywords: scotland arbroath cemetery war grave mortuary building sandstone
20120115Arbroath 6PR 
 $ Arbroath War Memorial on a cold winters morning. 
 Keywords: Angus, Scotland, Arbroath, 2012, memorial, war
20120115Arbroath 7PR 
 $ Arbroath War Memorial on a cold winters morning. 
 Keywords: Angus, Scotland, Arbroath, 2012, memorial, war
20120115Arbroath 8PR 
 $ Arbroath War Memorial on a cold winters morning. 
 Keywords: Angus, Scotland, Arbroath, 2012, memorial, war
20140510BarryMill 1PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 2PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 3PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows resident Master Miller Peter Ellis chatting to Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 4PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows resident Master Miller Peter Ellis chatting to Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 5PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows resident Master Miller Peter Ellis chatting to Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 6PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows some visiting millers alongside Barry Mill's Master Miller Peter Ellis(2nd from left) alongside Ellis Enid Gauldie(3rd from left), author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140903WatsonWattPR-1 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-10 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-11 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-12 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-13 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-14 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-15 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows the Princess Royal chatting to Trish Burke
pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-16 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, art, artist, plaque
20140903WatsonWattPR-17 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows sculptor Alan Herriot(right) with a relative of Watson-Watt's KallemHaquani

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-18 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows sculptor Alan Herriot(right) with a relative of Watson-Watt's KallemHaquani

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, Kallem Haquani, art, artist
20140903WatsonWattPR-19 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows sculptor Alan Herriot(right) with a relative of Watson-Watt's Kallem Haquani

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, art, artist, Kallem Haquani
20140903WatsonWattPR-2 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-20 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows Alan Herriot with his sculpture

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, artist, art, historic
20140903WatsonWattPR-21 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-3 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-5 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows The Princess Royal with sculptor Alan Herriot
pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, art, artist
20140903WatsonWattPR-6 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-7 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows the Princess Royal chatting to vip's including sculptor Alan Herriot(facing)

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-8 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-9 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20170713Sunnyside 10PR 
 Sunnyside Hospital, Hillside near Montrose, Angus..Pic shows the war memorial in the grounds...pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Montrose;Hillside;Sunnyside Hospital;hospita;health;building;historic;sale;sold;, war memorial, memorial, soldier, war, dead
436T0045 PR 
 First World War Memorial in the Mid Links, Montrose 
 Keywords: Montrose, memorial, sculpture, Mid Links, sky
436T7277 Montrose PR 
 War memorial at Montrose's Mid Links. 
 Keywords: Montrose, Mid Links, memorial, war, statue
7227248 
 The Airlie Monument,Angus

The monument was built in 1901 in honour of David Ogilvy, the 9th Earl of Airlie (1856 - 1900) who was killed in South Africa at the Battle of Diamond Hill during the Boer War. It is based on a tower from the Earl's home, Airlie Castle. Balmashanner Hill War Memorial, located to the southof Forfar, is similar. 
 Keywords: tulloch, hill, glen, clova, monument, airlie, angus
8191278 
 War memorial at Montrose's Mid Links. 
 Keywords: Montrose, Mid Links, memorial, war, dark, evening, garden, park, statue, angel
8195704 
 Montrose Mid Links public gardens and recreation area. War memorial with angel statue 
 Keywords: Mid Links, Montrose, memorial, park, seat
8606857 
 War Memorial Building, Aboyne , Aberdeenshire, Scotland was built in 1924 
 Keywords: Aboyne Deeside Aberdeenshire War Memorial Building Royal
8620338 
 War Memorial, Peterculter, Deeside, Abberdeenshire, Scotland

Peterculter, the latter part of the name is said to be derived from the Gaelic compound word Cul-tir, which signifies the back part of the country, and would correctly apply to a considerable portion of the land on both sides of the Dee.

King William the Lion bestowed the church of Kulter, ?iuxta Abirdene?,upon the Abbey and monks of St Mary of Kelso, about 1165 ? 99. Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: war, memorial, peterculter, aberdeen

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arts and Entertainment (48 files)

All aspects of the arts and the entertainment industry
20060623Bamse 1PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20060623Bamse 2PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20060623Bamse 3PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20060623Bamse 4PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20060623Bamse 5PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot with his own dog while working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20060623Bamse 6PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot with his own dog while working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20060623Bamse 7PR 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway.
Pic shows Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot working on the sculpture in his studio
Pic Paul Reid...... 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2006, Alan Herriot, sculptor, sculpture, dog, Bamse, art, artist, clay, Montrose, Angus, sea, Norway, Norwegian, navy, hero, World Warr ll, Edinburgh
20130429Watson-WattPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 11PR 
 Pic shows St Ninians Square in Brechin where Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt will be situated.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 13PR 
 Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 14PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 15PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot.
The sculpture which has just been imortilized in bronze will be Brechin's first ever statue and will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born in 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 3PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 4PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 5PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 6PR 
 Pic shows detail from Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 9PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt 1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140903WatsonWattPR-1 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-10 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-11 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-12 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-13 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-14 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-15 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows the Princess Royal chatting to Trish Burke
pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-16 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, art, artist, plaque
20140903WatsonWattPR-17 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows sculptor Alan Herriot(right) with a relative of Watson-Watt's KallemHaquani

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-18 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows sculptor Alan Herriot(right) with a relative of Watson-Watt's KallemHaquani

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, Kallem Haquani, art, artist
20140903WatsonWattPR-19 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows sculptor Alan Herriot(right) with a relative of Watson-Watt's Kallem Haquani

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, art, artist, Kallem Haquani
20140903WatsonWattPR-2 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-20 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows Alan Herriot with his sculpture

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, artist, art, historic
20140903WatsonWattPR-21 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-3 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-5 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows The Princess Royal with sculptor Alan Herriot
pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal, art, artist
20140903WatsonWattPR-6 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-7 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

Pic shows the Princess Royal chatting to vip's including sculptor Alan Herriot(facing)

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-8 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20140903WatsonWattPR-9 
 Princess Royal unveils a statue of Robert Watson-Watt by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot. Watson-Watt was born and grew up in Brechin and was the pioneer of radar. The ununveiling also marks the anniversary of the outbreak of World War Two

The radar system Watson-Watt helped develop was described as Britain's "secret weapon" in the war, and was credited with winning the Battle of Britain.

It has taken the Angus town's Robert Watson-Watt Society eight years to raise the funds for the statue which is the only memorial to Watson-Watt.

pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot, Princess Royal
20160906KirriemuirPR1 
 Gateway to the Glens museum looking for a lost king to complete line-up of rare Toby jugs. Now on display at #Gatewaytotheglens museum are a set of ten Toby Jugs designed by Sir F Carruthers Gould. The complete set of eleven magnificent wartime memorabilia ceramic items of World War I political and military leaders were crafted between 1915-20 by Wilkinson after designs by Sir Francis Carruthers Gould. Gould was the first political cartoonist ever hired by a British daily newspaper, the Pall Mall Budget in 1888. He also was a cartoonist for the Westminster Gazette where his Kruger cartoon had first appeared. Only 150 complete sets of eleven were possible because the smallest run was of 150 jugs of WW1 General Louis Botha the formal Boer War General. On display are ten - Lord Kitchener, Field Marshall John French, Field Marshall Douglas Haig, Prime Minister David Lloyd George, Marshall Joseph Joffre, Admiral John Jellicoe, Admiral David Beatty, Marshall Ferdinand Foch, President Woodro

Pic shows the current ten Toby Jugs on display at the museum......
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Kirriemuir;Gateway to the Glens museum;museum;Toby Jugs;ceramic;collection;exhibit
20160906KirriemuirPR3 
 Gateway to the Glens museum looking for a lost king to complete line-up of rare Toby jugs. Now on display at #Gatewaytotheglens museum are a set of ten Toby Jugs designed by Sir F Carruthers Gould. The complete set of eleven magnificent wartime memorabilia ceramic items of World War I political and military leaders were crafted between 1915-20 by Wilkinson after designs by Sir Francis Carruthers Gould. Gould was the first political cartoonist ever hired by a British daily newspaper, the Pall Mall Budget in 1888. He also was a cartoonist for the Westminster Gazette where his Kruger cartoon had first appeared. Only 150 complete sets of eleven were possible because the smallest run was of 150 jugs of WW1 General Louis Botha the formal Boer War General. On display are ten - Lord Kitchener, Field Marshall John French, Field Marshall Douglas Haig, Prime Minister David Lloyd George, Marshall Joseph Joffre, Admiral John Jellicoe, Admiral David Beatty, Marshall Ferdinand Foch, President Woodro

Pic shows museum assistant Ailsa Lindop with the current ten Toby Jugs on display at the museum......
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Kirriemuir;Gateway to the Glens museum;museum;Toby Jugs;ceramic;collection;exhibit
20160906KirriemuirPR4 
 Gateway to the Glens museum looking for a lost king to complete line-up of rare Toby jugs. Now on display at #Gatewaytotheglens museum are a set of ten Toby Jugs designed by Sir F Carruthers Gould. The complete set of eleven magnificent wartime memorabilia ceramic items of World War I political and military leaders were crafted between 1915-20 by Wilkinson after designs by Sir Francis Carruthers Gould. Gould was the first political cartoonist ever hired by a British daily newspaper, the Pall Mall Budget in 1888. He also was a cartoonist for the Westminster Gazette where his Kruger cartoon had first appeared. Only 150 complete sets of eleven were possible because the smallest run was of 150 jugs of WW1 General Louis Botha the formal Boer War General. On display are ten - Lord Kitchener, Field Marshall John French, Field Marshall Douglas Haig, Prime Minister David Lloyd George, Marshall Joseph Joffre, Admiral John Jellicoe, Admiral David Beatty, Marshall Ferdinand Foch, President Woodro

Pic shows museum assistant Ailsa Lindop with the current ten Toby Jugs on display at the museum......
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Kirriemuir;Gateway to the Glens museum;museum;Toby Jugs;ceramic;collection;exhibit
20160906KirriemuirPR5 
 Gateway to the Glens museum looking for a lost king to complete line-up of rare Toby jugs. Now on display at #Gatewaytotheglens museum are a set of ten Toby Jugs designed by Sir F Carruthers Gould. The complete set of eleven magnificent wartime memorabilia ceramic items of World War I political and military leaders were crafted between 1915-20 by Wilkinson after designs by Sir Francis Carruthers Gould. Gould was the first political cartoonist ever hired by a British daily newspaper, the Pall Mall Budget in 1888. He also was a cartoonist for the Westminster Gazette where his Kruger cartoon had first appeared. Only 150 complete sets of eleven were possible because the smallest run was of 150 jugs of WW1 General Louis Botha the formal Boer War General. On display are ten - Lord Kitchener, Field Marshall John French, Field Marshall Douglas Haig, Prime Minister David Lloyd George, Marshall Joseph Joffre, Admiral John Jellicoe, Admiral David Beatty, Marshall Ferdinand Foch, President Woodro

Pic shows one of the current ten Toby Jugs on display at the museum......
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Kirriemuir;Gateway to the Glens museum;museum;Toby Jugs;ceramic;collection;exhibit

Arts and Entertainment > Literature and Visual Arts (36 files)

Artists, authors, painting, sculpture, exhibitions, antiques, books, poetry and libraries
14933218 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933317 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933363 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933388 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933402 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933428 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933480 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933495 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933501 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933510 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933523 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933537 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
20140510BarryMill 1PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 2PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 3PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows resident Master Miller Peter Ellis chatting to Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 4PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows resident Master Miller Peter Ellis chatting to Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
20140510BarryMill 5PR 
 BARRY MILL at Barry near Carnoustie have opened a bicentennial exhibition. The launch on Saturday led by resident Master miller Peter Ellis and Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller, welcomed invited guests including Millers and enthusiasts from across Scotland who attended the event.
An appeal to help clear up the history of a 470-year-old Angus mill has seen a surge of interest with details about the best-known part of its history including a great fire there in 1814 and the period of the First World War and fresh details about the family who operated the mill during those years.
The exhibition was opened to the public today(Sunday).

Pic shows resident Master Miller Peter Ellis chatting to Ellis Enid Gauldie, author of the Scottish Country Miller outside the historic mill.
....pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Barry Mill, Barry, Scotland, miller, agriculture, industry, buiolding, historic, history, Peter Ellis, Ellis Enid Gauldie
7227253 
 William Lamb's statue Le Paresseux (lazybones) outside Montrose Museum at Montrose . William Lamb was born in a small cottage in Mill Street, Montrose on the 1st June 1893.

In 1925, Lamb had works accepted in three prestigious exhibitions: The Royal Scottish Academy, The Royal Academy, London, and the Paris Salon. 
 Keywords: world, war, first, wounded, right, arm, hand, left, mason, lazy
7245180 
 William Lamb statue on Montrose's High Street
William Lamb was born in a small cottage in Mill Street, Montrose on the 1st June 1893. At the age of thirteen, he was apprenticed to his older brother James as a stone mason and monumental sculptor. During his apprenticeship, Lamb attended continuation classes at Montrose Academy and was encouraged by his art teacher, Lena Gaudie.

At the outbreak of the First World War, Lamb enlisted with the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. He was wounded twice and eventually invalided out of the army with extensive damage to his right hand. Undeterred by this trauma, Lamb attended Edinburgh College of Art where he taught himself to draw, paint and sculpt with his left hand.
In 1932 Lamb was commissioned by the Duchess of York, a native of Angus, to model portrait heads of her daughters, the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret Rose. Impressed by his skill, the Duchess also commissioned Lamb to produce a portrait of herself. 
 Keywords: Montrose, statue, High Street, William, Lamb, artist, sculptor, one-handed, queen, mother, duchess, york, elizabeth, margaret, rose
7245692 
 Members of the British Legion march up Montrose's High Street, as a William Lamb statue appears to pay its respects, on their way to a memorial service in the town.

William Lamb overcame loss of his right hand in World War I to bacome a prominent artist 
 Keywords: British, Legion, Montrose, march, William Lamb, sculpture, veteren
7263681 
 Sculptor Alan Herriot's Bamse sculpture at Montrose. The 50,000 bronze memorial of a St Bernard dog was unveiled by Prince Andrew on 17th October 2006.
Bamse was regarded as a hero while based with the Norwegian Navy at Montrose and Dundee during the 2nd World War. He is said to have saved a sailor from drowning with tales of breaking up fights and helping sailors back to the ship from public houses etc. The dog, who died more than 60 years ago, was also honoured in 2006 with the animal equivalent of the George Cross. 
 Keywords: Bamse Montrose Alan Herriot sculpture statue memorial, dog St Bernard hero Norway Navy artist
7263683 
 Sculptor Alan Herriot's Bamse sculpture at Montrose. The 50,000 bronze memorial of a St Bernard dog was unveiled by Prince Andrew on 17th October2006.
Bamse was regarded as a hero while based with the Norwegian Navy at Montrose and Dundee during the 2nd World War. He is said to have saved a sailor from drowning with tales of breaking up fights and helping sailors back to the ship from public houses etc. The dog, who died more than 60 years ago, was also honoured in 2006 with the animal equivalent of the George Cross. 
 Keywords: Bamse Montrose Alan Herriot, sculpture statue, memorial, dog, St Bernard, hero, Norway Navy
7263688 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised 50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: Bamse Montrose Alan Herriot statue, memorial dog St Bernard hero Norway Navy
8561046 
 Scottish watercolour painter Joseph Maxwell at the Eduardo Alessandro Studios, Dundee. Maxwell is an accomplished teacher and painter. A distinguished member of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Water Colours, he shows frequently in group exhibitions, and was one of 10 artists chosen by the Royal Academy in 1978 to show work in the Louvre in Paris. His exhibition Light of Two Lands has been 10 years in the making, and is his first solo show for more than a decade. It consists of a selection of more than 40 works from his two favourite painting spots, the countryside around his home in Grandtully, near Aberfeldy, and the Marche area of Italy near Macerata. His landscapes are quiet and carefully composed, with delicate, moody colour, often with a subtle geometry in their composition that indicates his love of line. Maxwell was born in Leith, the son of policeman, and left school at 15 to work in the Co-op - "the worst clerk they ever had". After a brief spell in the police, he worked for Ordnance Survey drawing maps, before joining the RAF when war broke out as a cartographer and draughtsman. 
 Keywords: Joseph, Maxwell, watercolour, artist, Louvre, eduardo, Alessandro, studios, gallery, Aberfeldy, Grandtully, Marche, Italy, Macerata, landscapes, Leith
8561051 
 Scottish watercolour painter Joseph Maxwell at the Eduardo Alessandro Studios, Dundee. Maxwell is an accomplished teacher and painter. A distinguished member of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Water Colours, he shows frequently in group exhibitions, and was one of 10 artists chosen by the Royal Academy in 1978 to show work in the Louvre in Paris. His exhibition Light of Two Lands has been 10 years in the making, and is his first solo show for more than a decade. It consists of a selection of more than 40 works from his two favourite painting spots, the countryside around his home in Grandtully, near Aberfeldy, and the Marche area of Italy near Macerata. His landscapes are quiet and carefully composed, with delicate, moody colour, often with a subtle geometry in their composition that indicates his love of line. Maxwell was born in Leith, the son of policeman, and left school at 15 to work in the Co-op - "the worst clerk they ever had". After a brief spell in the police, he worked for Ordnance Survey drawing maps, before joining the RAF when war broke out as a cartographer and draughtsman. 
 Keywords: Joseph, Maxwell, watercolour, artist, Louvre, eduardo, Alessandro, studios, gallery, Aberfeldy, Grandtully, Marche, Italy, Macerata, landscapes, Leith
8561056 
 Scottish watercolour painter Joseph Maxwell at the Eduardo Alessandro Studios, Dundee. Maxwell is an accomplished teacher and painter. A distinguished member of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Water Colours, he shows frequently in group exhibitions, and was one of 10 artists chosen by the Royal Academy in 1978 to show work in the Louvre in Paris. His exhibition Light of Two Lands has been 10 years in the making, and is his first solo show for more than a decade. It consists of a selection of more than 40 works from his two favourite painting spots, the countryside around his home in Grandtully, near Aberfeldy, and the Marche area of Italy near Macerata. His landscapes are quiet and carefully composed, with delicate, moody colour, often with a subtle geometry in their composition that indicates his love of line. Maxwell was born in Leith, the son of policeman, and left school at 15 to work in the Co-op - "the worst clerk they ever had". After a brief spell in the police, he worked for Ordnance Survey drawing maps, before joining the RAF when war broke out as a cartographer and draughtsman. 
 Keywords: Joseph, Maxwell, watercolour, artist, Louvre, eduardo, Alessandro, studios, gallery, Aberfeldy, Grandtully, Marche, Italy, Macerata, landscapes, Leith
8561071 
 Scottish watercolour painter Joseph Maxwell at the Eduardo Alessandro Studios, Dundee. Maxwell is an accomplished teacher and painter. A distinguished member of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Water Colours, he shows frequently in group exhibitions, and was one of 10 artists chosen by the Royal Academy in 1978 to show work in the Louvre in Paris. His exhibition Light of Two Lands has been 10 years in the making, and is his first solo show for more than a decade. It consists of a selection of more than 40 works from his two favourite painting spots, the countryside around his home in Grandtully, near Aberfeldy, and the Marche area of Italy near Macerata. His landscapes are quiet and carefully composed, with delicate, moody colour, often with a subtle geometry in their composition that indicates his love of line. Maxwell was born in Leith, the son of policeman, and left school at 15 to work in the Co-op - "the worst clerk they ever had". After a brief spell in the police, he worked for Ordnance Survey drawing maps, before joining the RAF when war broke out as a cartographer and draughtsman. 
 Keywords: Joseph, Maxwell, watercolour, artist, Louvre, eduardo, Alessandro, studios, gallery, Aberfeldy, Grandtully, Marche, Italy, Macerata, landscapes, Leith
8561086 
 Scottish watercolour painter Joseph Maxwell at the Eduardo Alessandro Studios, Dundee. Maxwell is an accomplished teacher and painter. A distinguished member of the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Water Colours, he shows frequently in group exhibitions, and was one of 10 artists chosen by the Royal Academy in 1978 to show work in the Louvre in Paris. His exhibition Light of Two Lands has been 10 years in the making, and is his first solo show for more than a decade. It consists of a selection of more than 40 works from his two favourite painting spots, the countryside around his home in Grandtully, near Aberfeldy, and the Marche area of Italy near Macerata. His landscapes are quiet and carefully composed, with delicate, moody colour, often with a subtle geometry in their composition that indicates his love of line. Maxwell was born in Leith, the son of policeman, and left school at 15 to work in the Co-op - "the worst clerk they ever had". After a brief spell in the police, he worked for Ordnance Survey drawing maps, before joining the RAF when war broke out as a cartographer and draughtsman. 
 Keywords: Joseph, Maxwell, watercolour, artist, Louvre, eduardo, Alessandro, studios, gallery, Aberfeldy, Grandtully, Marche, Italy, Macerata, landscapes, Leith
8637808 
 Joseph Hume statue, High Street, Montrose, Angus, Scotland.
Joseph Hume (1777-1855) was born in Montrose. After a medical training at Edinburgh University he became an assistant surgeon in the East India Company in 1797. His proficiency for language enabled him to become very wealthy during his service in India. After the end of the Mahratta war Joseph removed to England and was influenced by the political philosophy of James Mill and Jeremy Bentham. He served as a Member of Parliament in 1812 and from 1818-55. Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: Joseph, Hume, statue, montrose, physician, East, india, company, member, parliament
8647519 
 One of the many statues by Montrose sculptor William Lamb which can be found in the town. A studio was opened in 1955 as a memorial to him featuring a permanent exhibition of his work and is open to the public in the summer.
William Lamb was born in a small cottage in Mill Street, Montrose on the 1st June 1893. At the age of thirteen, he was apprenticed to his older brother James as a stone mason and monumental sculptor. Lamb died in 1932
At the outbreak of the First World War, Lamb enlisted with the Queen?s Own Cameron Highlanders and fought in Belgium and France. He was wounded twice and eventually invalided out of the army with extensive damage to his right hand. Undeterred by this trauma, Lamb attended Edinburgh College of Art where he taught himself to draw, paint and sculpt with his left hand 
 Keywords: William Lamb sculptor Montrose Angus statue
8856985 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8856990 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857018 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857028 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857039 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857090 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity. Elton John's contribution 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,

Sport not football (1 file)

Sport and recreation
20090816Cortachy 1PR 
 Cortachy Highland Games.
Competitors battling to hold on in the tug o' war. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Cortachy, Dykehead, Highland Games, Tug o' war, competition, competitor, sport, fun

Arbroath (3 files)

20100514Arbroath1PR 
 $ Western Cemetery Arbroath. The Mortuary building is a much admired piece of architecture. The cemetery contains war graves from both world wars. 
 Keywords: scotland arbroath cemetery war grave mortuary building sandstone
20100514Arbroath2PR 
 $ Western Cemetery Arbroath. The Mortuary building is a much admired piece of architecture. The cemetery contains war graves from both world wars. 
 Keywords: scotland arbroath cemetery war grave mortuary building sandstone
20100514Arbroath3PR 
 $ Western Cemetery Arbroath. The Mortuary building is a much admired piece of architecture. The cemetery contains war graves from both world wars. 
 Keywords: scotland arbroath cemetery war grave mortuary building sandstone

Arbroath > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Glamis (1 file)

Glamis Castle, village and the Strathmore family. The Queen Mother was brought up here
7453113 
 Grand Scottish Proms concert in grounds of Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotland. National Symphony Orchestra of Scotland conducted by Iain Sutherland

Glamis Castle is well known as the place where Elizabeth, late Queen Mother of the UK and wife of war-time King George VI, was brought up. 
 Keywords: Glamis, Glamis Castle, concert, Angus, Scotland, Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother, George VI, Scottish Prom, National Symphoby Orchestra, Iain Sutherland

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