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Education, Medical and Research (12 files)

Images from schools, universities, medical and research establishments
16531018 
 Jayant Sharad Vaidya, Senior Lecturer and Consultant Surgeon at the Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School,
University of Dundee.

Mr Jayant Sharad Vaidya gives his career aim as, "To improve our understanding of cancer and translate this into clinical service."

Pic: Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Doctor medical cancer research breast Sharad Vaidya Jayant Molecular Oncology University Dundee
16531027 
 Jayant Sharad Vaidya, Senior Lecturer and Consultant Surgeon at the Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School,
University of Dundee.

Mr Jayant Sharad Vaidya gives his career aim as, "To improve our understanding of cancer and translate this into clinical service."

Pic: Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Doctor medical cancer research breast Sharad Vaidya Jayant Molecular Oncology University Dundee
16531036 
 Jayant Sharad Vaidya, Senior Lecturer and Consultant Surgeon at the
Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School,
University of Dundee.

Mr Jayant Sharad Vaidya gives his career aim as, "To improve our understanding of cancer and translate this into clinical service."

Pic: Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus, Pictures, Paul, Reid, 2008, Doctor, health, medical, cancer, research, breast, Sharad, Vaidya, Jayant Vaidya, Molecular, Oncology, Medical, School, lecturer, University, Dundee
16531043 
 Jayant Sharad Vaidya, Senior Lecturer and Consultant Surgeon at the Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School,
University of Dundee.

Mr Jayant Sharad Vaidya gives his career aim as, "To improve our understanding of cancer and translate this into clinical service."

Pic: Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Doctor medical cancer research breast Sharad Vaidya Jayant Molecular Oncology University Dundee
9372575 
 The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland. In addition to the hospital, there is a teaching section that includes the medical school and nursing school of University of Dundee. As such it was the second purpose built medical school in UK.

[Wikipedia] 
 Keywords: Ninewells, hospital, Dundee, Tayside, Scotland, medical, school, university, Scotland
9372672 
 The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland. In addition to the hospital, there is a teaching section that includes the medical school and nursing school of University of Dundee. As such it was the second purpose built medical school in UK.

[Wikipedia] 
 Keywords: Ninewells, hospital, Dundee, Tayside, Scotland, medical, school, university, Scotland
9372717 
 The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland. In addition to the hospital, there is a teaching section that includes the medical school and nursing school of University of Dundee. As such it was the second purpose built medical school in UK.

[Wikipedia] 
 Keywords: Ninewells, hospital, Dundee, Tayside, Scotland, medical, school, university, Scotland
Abertay 2PR 
 University of Abertay, Science Students 
 Keywords: University of Abertay, Science Students
Abertay 3PR 
 University of Abertay, Science Students 
 Keywords: University of Abertay, Science Students
Abertay 4PR 
 University of Abertay, Science Students 
 Keywords: University of Abertay, Science Students
Abertay 5PR 
 University of Abertay, Science Students 
 Keywords: University of Abertay, Science Students
Abertay 6PR 
 University of Abertay, Science Students 
 Keywords: University of Abertay, Science Students

GV General Views (16 files)

20140515Watson-Watt10PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt11PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott next to his sculpture
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows the Sir Robert Watson-Watt staue at Powderhall Foundry in Edinburgh....pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt13PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after arrival
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt14PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after being lowered into place
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt15PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt1PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt21PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture
20140515Watson-Watt2PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt3PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin......pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt4PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt6PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt7PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt8PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott in front of his statue
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt9PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt 20PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture

GV General Views > Rural and Scenic views (3 files)

Calendar and postcard type images mainly of the countryside. Some farming pictures, but most are in industry
8605127 
 Pond in greenhouse, Dundee University Botanic Gardens, Dundee, Scotland with water lilies and goldfish Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: botanic, gardens, dundee, university, pond, greenhouse, glasshouse, water, lily, lilies, goldfish, carp
8605150 
 Pond in greenhouse, Dundee University Botanic Gardens, Dundee, Scotland with water lilies and goldfish Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: botanic, gardens, dundee, university, pond, greenhouse, glasshouse, water, lily, lilies, goldfish, carp
8605164 
 Sundial, Dundee University Botanic Gardens, Dundee, Scotland Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: botanic, gardens, university, dundee, sun, dial

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arts and Entertainment (17 files)

All aspects of the arts and the entertainment industry
20130429Watson-WattPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 11PR 
 Pic shows St Ninians Square in Brechin where Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt will be situated.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 13PR 
 Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 14PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 15PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot.
The sculpture which has just been imortilized in bronze will be Brechin's first ever statue and will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born in 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 3PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 4PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 5PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 6PR 
 Pic shows detail from Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 9PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt 1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arts and Entertainment > Performing arts (14 files)

Images of performers and performances in theatre and concert hall - classical, contemporary and pop
13184489 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster

. ..Pic:Paul Reid Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee Union University indie
13184571 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union

. ..Pic:Paul Reid Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee Union University indie Kyle Falconer
13184722 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee University indie Kyle Falconer
13184726 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee University indie Kyle Falconer
13184748 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures band music the View, Dundee University indie Kyle Falconer
13362692 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band formed in March 2007 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures Brogues Dundee University Sean Cruickshank Scotland
13362713 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band. The Brogues formed in March 2007 the band came about from various drunken chats, love of the same kind of music, mutual friends, acquaintances, Gretsch guitars and quite possibly fate if you believe in that sort of thing. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures Brogues Dundee University Sean Cruickshank Scotland
20071213Brogues1PR 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band formed in March 2007. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Brogues, Dundee, University, Sean Cruickshank, Scotland
20071213BroguesPR 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band formed in March 2007. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Brogues, Dundee, University, Sean Cruickshank, Scotland
20071213ViewIMG 7350PR 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View, view, Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7371PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7396PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7420PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7451PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University

Arts and Entertainment > Literature and Visual Arts (15 files)

Artists, authors, painting, sculpture, exhibitions, antiques, books, poetry and libraries
20080724Gladstone11PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pic shows Gladstone's family home, Fasque near Fettercairn, Aberdeenshire built in 1809 and bought by Sir John Gladstone, father of Prime Minister William Gladstone, in 1829. The mansion was recently sold off. 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 10PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 10PR copy 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 1PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 2PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 3PR copy 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 4PR copy 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 5PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 6PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 7PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 7PR copy 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
20080724Gladstone 8PR 
 One of the most important private collections of books to be sold at auction in Scotland in decades has been offered at Taylor's Auction Rooms in Montrose. The sale in question contains books removed from The Library at Fasque, Fettercairn beffore the house was sold. William Gladstone, one of Britain's most celebrated Prime Ministers started to collect the books whilst studying at Oxford University. He spent many hours visiting the local book shops and gathered together a wide range of books on a variety of subjects. This collection was enhanced by subsequent members of the family including his brother Thomas & nephew John. Pics show the Library and some pages from the colletion 
 Keywords: auction Gladstone Fasque Montrose Taylors books literature collection
7245346 
 Artist David Mach at Sensation in Dundee.

Mach studied at the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art (now a school of University of Dundee), Dundee, Scotland from 1974, graduating in 1979, then at the Royal College of Art, London between 1979 ? 82. Following several shows and public installations, Mach was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1988. In 2000 he joined the Royal Academy of Arts as Professor of Sculpture. 
 Keywords: mach, david, sensation, dundee, artist
8194865 
 Opening of the 400,000 Hannah MacLure Centre - a recently completed Student Centre at the University of Abertay in Dundee. Left to right: Artist Ronnie Forbes, Stuart Cosgrove - Head of Nations & Regions at Channel 4 TV and Professor Bernard King 
 Keywords: Hannah MacLure Centre Dundee Stuart Cosgrove Ronnie Forbes Bernard King student centre
8637808 
 Joseph Hume statue, High Street, Montrose, Angus, Scotland.
Joseph Hume (1777-1855) was born in Montrose. After a medical training at Edinburgh University he became an assistant surgeon in the East India Company in 1797. His proficiency for language enabled him to become very wealthy during his service in India. After the end of the Mahratta war Joseph removed to England and was influenced by the political philosophy of James Mill and Jeremy Bentham. He served as a Member of Parliament in 1812 and from 1818-55. Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: Joseph, Hume, statue, montrose, physician, East, india, company, member, parliament

Arts and Entertainment > Performing arts (14 files)

Images of performers and performances in theatre and concert hall - classical, contemporary and pop
13184489 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster

. ..Pic:Paul Reid Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee Union University indie
13184571 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union

. ..Pic:Paul Reid Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee Union University indie Kyle Falconer
13184722 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee University indie Kyle Falconer
13184726 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee University indie Kyle Falconer
13184748 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band, The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland performing live at Dundee Universty Student Union 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures band music the View, Dundee University indie Kyle Falconer
13362692 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band formed in March 2007 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures Brogues Dundee University Sean Cruickshank Scotland
13362713 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band. The Brogues formed in March 2007 the band came about from various drunken chats, love of the same kind of music, mutual friends, acquaintances, Gretsch guitars and quite possibly fate if you believe in that sort of thing. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures Brogues Dundee University Sean Cruickshank Scotland
20071213Brogues1PR 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band formed in March 2007. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Brogues, Dundee, University, Sean Cruickshank, Scotland
20071213BroguesPR 
 Sean Cruickshank of The Brogues playing at Dundee University.
The Brogues are a Dundee band formed in March 2007. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Brogues, Dundee, University, Sean Cruickshank, Scotland
20071213ViewIMG 7350PR 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View, view, Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7371PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7396PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7420PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University
20071213ViewIMG 7451PR 
 Kyle Falconer of Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland on stage at Dundee University Student Union . 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View Dundee Union, Student, University

Nature and Wildlife (4 files)

Includes domestic and wild animals and country and farming themes
8561420 
 Damien Doyle & Andrew Pryde from St Fergus Primary School in Dundee get acquainted with Desert Locusts at Dundee University where the visiting children learned about 'Mini Beasts' 
 Keywords: Desert, Locust, Dundee, University, Mini beasts, St Fergus, Primary, School
8605109 
 Magnolia Stellata, - Star Magnolia (Japan)
Dundee University Botanic Gardens, Dundee, Scotland. Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: magnolia, stellata, star, botanic
8674212 
 Damien Doyle & Andrew Pryde from St Fergus Primary School in Dundee get aquainted with Desert Locusts at Dundee University where the visiting children learned about 'Mini Beasts' 
 Keywords: desert, locust, dundee, university, St Fergus, mini, beast
Beasts 3PR 
 Damien Doyle & Andrew Pryde from St Fergus Primary School in Dundee get aquainted with Desert Locusts at Dundee University where the visiting children learned about 'Mini Beasts' 
 Keywords: locust dundee university minibeasts

Sport not football (1 file)

Sport and recreation
8813382 
 Andy Coogan, who lives in Carnoustie, leading the field on the final bend of the Ibrox Mile in 1940 in front of crowd of 90.000 with Stucco of Edinburgh University in 2nd followed by Englands Sydney Wooderson who went on to win the race........Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Andy, Coogan, Runner, Harrier, Ibrox, Mile, Stucco, Sydney, Wooderson, 1940, athlete, sprinter

Arbroath > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

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