Paul Reid Photographer 
 
 

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No specific category (3 files)

7455601 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised 50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7455603 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised 50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7457648 
 Henny King fundraiser for Bamze the dog memorial in Montrose. with a latter day Bamse. 
 Keywords: norwegian, navy, sailors, second, world, war

Military (57 files)

Not marines
20130915Kylesku PR-1-2 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-1-3 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the Kylesku bridge...there was no bridge when the x craft left from here on their missin from left to right
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub, bridge
20130915Kylesku PR-1 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-2 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows detail from the memorial
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-3 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows detail on the memorial 
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-4 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915MiniSub 10aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Lt John Lorimer on board shipe with the crew of the X6 .....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 10bPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows .Lt John Lorimer on board shipo with the the crew of the X6 ....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 10PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the crew of the X6 ...Lt John Lorimer ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 11PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer marrying his wife and Nayvy wren Judith in Ayr two days after receiving his DSO medal at Buckingham Palace...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 12PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer marrying his wife and Nayvy wren Judith in Ayr two days after receiving his DSO medal at Buckingham Palace...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 13PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic press cuttings...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 14PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows press cutting...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 15aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the reverse side of X craft hero John Lorimer's medal gifted to him by the German sailors personel who were on board tirpitz when the ship was attacked by Lorimer and his colleagues ......... Silver medal 1984 Germany Medal in commemoration 1944 Fight in the Arctic Sea. Battlestar Tirpitz ..pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 15PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer's medal gifted to him by the German sailors personel who were on board tirpitz when the ship was attacked by Lorimer and his colleagues ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 16PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows a sketch by Commanding Officer Lt Donald Cameron from Carluke who was given a VC gifted to John Lorimer at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire.
Pic shows the X6 being left behind by the towing submarine before the attack, charging batteries by winding a dyanamo in the dark with the Tirpitz lit up in the background and finally The terpitz(left) with the X6 sub's periscope inthe foreground
...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 17PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows a sketch by Commanding Officer Cameron who was given a VC gifted to John Lorimer at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire.
Pic shows the view on approaching the Tirpitz, the sub crew being captured before the x6 sub sank after dropping their explosives and the explosion 1 hour later....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 19PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer on board the Trepitz after his arrest ..pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 1aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(91) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 1PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 27PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 28PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 29PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 2PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 30PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 31PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 32PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 3PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 4PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 5PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire with his collection of medals including his DSO medal(left)..Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 6PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire with his collection of medals including his DSO medal(left)..Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 7PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer's(91) DSO medal.Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 8PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(91) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 9PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the crew of the X6 ....LT Wilson- (passage crew commanding officer), commanding officer Lt. Donald Cameron(crew), Lt. John Lorimer(crew), 
Front row Lt. R. Kendall(crew), and Engine Room Artificer Ednund Goddard(crew);Leading Seaman McGregor(passage crew) and Stoker Oxley(passenger crew) ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130922Kylesku 100PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 101PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 102PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 103PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 104PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius(left) and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 105PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Stefano Manucci Command Warrant Officer Submarines with X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 106PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Stefano Manucci Command Warrant Officer Submarines with X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Stefano Manucci, Command Warrant Officer, Submarines
20130922Kylesku 107PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius(left) and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 108PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the loch next to the memorial where the subs headed out from on their way to Norway 
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 109PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Willie Elliott at the ceremony...Willie witnessed watched as a boy
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Willie Elliott
20130922Kylesku 110PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Willie Elliott at the ceremony...Willie witnessed watched as a boy
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Willie Elliott
20130922Kylesku 111PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the bridge at Kylesku which wasn't there when the mini-subs headed along from left to right and out to sea and Norway.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, bridge, road
20130922Kylesku 112PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors John Lorimer(left) and Adam Bergius at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 113aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the last post being played at the ceremony with the loch behind which the mini-subs had headed along on their way to Norway
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 93PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 94PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 95PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 96aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) (2nd from left)at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 96PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 97PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) laying a wreath next to the memorial at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 98aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 98PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony after laying a wreath next to the memorial at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 99PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony looking out at the loch and route the subs headed from for Norway
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval

Military > Not Royal Marines (8 files)

Images of and pertaining to the armed forces. Royal Marines have their own collection
7245304 
 Scottish/Norwegian Service in Montrose to mark the 60th anniversary of the death of a legendary heroic Norwegian St Bernard Dog 'Bamse' who led a dedicated life by looking after sailors in & around war time in Dundee & Montrose. The dogs grave is situated next to the GlaxoSmithKline perimeter fence in Montrose and is visited regularly where passers by lay stones. 
 Keywords: Bamse, dog, St Bernard, hero, Norway, Norwegian, World, War, second, 2, sailor, navy, honour, Montrose, Glaxo, hat, save, rescue, animal, Angus, grave, memorial
7455584 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7455668 
 Bamse is Montrose's very own war hero and is buried in the town. The St Bernard dog from Honningsvag, Norway stole the hearts of all who knew him. Bamse (meaning teddybear) arrived in Montrose on the minesweeper Thorodd during World War ll with Captain Erling Hafto and generally looked after his fellow sailors. If anyone started a fight with one of his crew, Bamse got up on his hind legs and at over six foot tall, clamped his great paws on the assailant to end any fight. 
The Bamse Project under Montrose Heritage Trust raised £50,000 to erect a larger than life-size bronze statue of Bamse at Montrose Harbour. Half the donations came from Norway. 
 Keywords: bamse, dog, saint, bernard, norway, montrose, second, world, war, hero, burial
7457230 
 D Day War Hero Orlando Gallacio at home in Brechin 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second, 6th, June 1944, veteran
7457241 
 D Day War veteran. Orlando Gallacio from Brechin took part in the D Day landings. 
 Keywords: world, war, II, two, second, Normandy, France, D Day
7457248 
 D Day War Hero, Orlando Gallacio from Brechin(right) pictured just after arriving in Normandy as he meets up with Forfar Photographer Alex Laing (left) 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second,
7457256 
 D Day War Hero Orlando Gallacio at home in Brechin 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second, 6th, June 1944, veteran
7457275 
 D Day War Hero Orlando Gallacio at home in Brechin 
 Keywords: world, war, two, II, second, 6th, June 1944, veteran

Education, Medical and Research (3 files)

Images from schools, universities, medical and research establishments
9372575 
 The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland. In addition to the hospital, there is a teaching section that includes the medical school and nursing school of University of Dundee. As such it was the second purpose built medical school in UK.

[Wikipedia] 
 Keywords: Ninewells, hospital, Dundee, Tayside, Scotland, medical, school, university, Scotland
9372672 
 The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland. In addition to the hospital, there is a teaching section that includes the medical school and nursing school of University of Dundee. As such it was the second purpose built medical school in UK.

[Wikipedia] 
 Keywords: Ninewells, hospital, Dundee, Tayside, Scotland, medical, school, university, Scotland
9372717 
 The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland. In addition to the hospital, there is a teaching section that includes the medical school and nursing school of University of Dundee. As such it was the second purpose built medical school in UK.

[Wikipedia] 
 Keywords: Ninewells, hospital, Dundee, Tayside, Scotland, medical, school, university, Scotland

GV General Views (16 files)

20140515Watson-Watt10PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt11PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott next to his sculpture
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows the Sir Robert Watson-Watt staue at Powderhall Foundry in Edinburgh....pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt13PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after arrival
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt14PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after being lowered into place
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt15PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt1PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt21PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture
20140515Watson-Watt2PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt3PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin......pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt4PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt6PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt7PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt8PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott in front of his statue
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt9PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt 20PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views (1 file)

Images made in towns and cities and images of specific buildings
8612849 
 Field Marshal Keith and Town House, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

Francis Edward James Keith (June 11, 1696 ? October 14, 1758) was a Scottish soldier and Prussian field marshal, was the second son of William, 9th Earl Marischal of Scotland, and was born at the castle of Inverugie near Peterhead. Photo Ian Paterson 
 Keywords: peterhead, town, house, field, marshall, keith, statue

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arts and Entertainment (25 files)

All aspects of the arts and the entertainment industry
20110312Byrne7PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 10PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 1PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 2PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 3PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 4PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 5PR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20110312Byrne 6aPR 
 Artist and author John Byrne(71) made a sentimental return to Hospitalfield House in Arbroath. The creator of ‘Tutti Frutti’ and ‘The Slab Boys’ spent a 12-week placement there in the hot summer of 1961 while he was a second year student at the Glasgow School of Art.

In a ceremony at the venue John became an honorary patron of Hospitalfield on a night also celebrating the first anniversary of the Friends of Hospitalfield House

..Pic:Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: 2011, Angus Pictures, Arbroath, Hospitalfield House, John Byrne, Paul Reid, art, artist, author, Scotland
20130429Watson-WattPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 11PR 
 Pic shows St Ninians Square in Brechin where Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt will be situated.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 13PR 
 Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 14PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 15PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot.
The sculpture which has just been imortilized in bronze will be Brechin's first ever statue and will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born in 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 3PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 4PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 5PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 6PR 
 Pic shows detail from Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 9PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt 1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arts and Entertainment > Performing arts (2 files)

Images of performers and performances in theatre and concert hall - classical, contemporary and pop
13184489 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster

. ..Pic:Paul Reid Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee Union University indie
20071213ViewIMG 7350PR 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View, view, Dundee Union, Student, University

Arts and Entertainment > Literature and Visual Arts (18 files)

Artists, authors, painting, sculpture, exhibitions, antiques, books, poetry and libraries
14933218 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933317 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933363 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933388 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933402 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933428 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933480 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933495 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933501 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933510 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933523 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
14933537 
 Murals, depicting pre-war Krakov and other scenes, painted by Polish soldiers billeted in Arbroath during the Second World War have been discovered there. Grants Shoe Factory building which was used as a billet for Polish troops stationed in the Angus town during the war. The soldiers' murals were uncovered as the building is being converted to luxury flats. Most of the Polish troops in Britain were stationed in Scotland for pre-deployment training. They succeeded in capturing the local girls' hearts leading to the present thriving Polish/Scottish community which is once again growing due to the European Union 
 Keywords: Grant shoe factory Poland soldier second world war billet painting mural Krakov
8856985 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8856990 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857018 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857028 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857039 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,
8857090 
 Some of the celebrity shoes gathered at Angus College in Arbroath in preperation for a world record line up attempt for charity. Elton John's contribution 
 Keywords: Grant, shoe, factory, Marine, Ballroom, Poland, soldier, second, world, war, Provost, Grant, billet, painting, mural, Krakov, Jamie, Tosh, FMS, Construction,

Arts and Entertainment > Performing arts (2 files)

Images of performers and performances in theatre and concert hall - classical, contemporary and pop
13184489 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster

. ..Pic:Paul Reid Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: band music The View Dundee Union University indie
20071213ViewIMG 7350PR 
 Dundee band The View an indie rock band from Dryburgh, Dundee, Scotland seconds before going on stage at Dundee Universty Student Union

L to R: Pete Reilly, Steven Morrison, Kyle Falconer & Keiran Webster 
 Keywords: band, music, pop, The View, view, Dundee Union, Student, University

Nature and Wildlife > Balinasloe Horse Fair (12 files)

Images from the well known Irish horse fair
8728575 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A skewbald foal sits on the grass beside her mother among the bustle.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, skewbald, foal
8728584 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A young boy shows off a bay bareback.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, bay,
8728588 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway
8728596 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A tricoloured pony being ridden among the herd.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, tri-coloured
8728602 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway
8728604 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, puppy, black
8728604 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, puppy, black
8728611 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A piebald cob shown off bareback

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, cob, piebald
8728617 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A piebald shows his head above the crowd.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, piebald
8728632 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A piebald shows above the herd.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, piebald
8728648 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. Adark bay ridden in the crowd 
The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, dark bay, ridden
8728696 
 International Horse Fair, Ballinasloe, County Galway Ireland. A skewbald shows his paces with a carriage.

The Ballinasloe Horse Fair has its origins in "The Gathering of the Hostings" dating back to the High Kings of Tara. Its formal charter was granted by King George to the Second Earl of Clancarty in 1722.

Today, over 80,000 horse lovers visit Ballinasloe during the week long festivities, pumping $3 million dollars into the local economy. 
 Keywords: Ballinasloe, horse, fair, Ireland, Galway, trotters, skewbald, carriage

Sport football (6 files)

Scottish Football
20110910Dundee Utd 1PR 
 Dundee Utd vs Rangers.
Rangers manager Ally McCoist gives the thumbs up seconds before kick off
..pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Dundee Utd, Dundee, Rangers, football, Scotland, Ally McCoist, manager, coach
20110910Dundee Utd 1PR 
 Dundee Utd vs Rangers.
Rangers manager Ally McCoist gives the thumbs up seconds before kick off
..pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Dundee Utd, Dundee, Rangers, football, Scotland, Ally McCoist, manager, coach
20110910Dundee Utd 2PR 
 Dundee Utd vs Rangers.
Rangers manager Ally McCoist seconds before kick off
..pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Dundee Utd, Dundee, Rangers, football, Scotland, Ally McCoist, manager, coach
20110910Dundee Utd 2PR 
 Dundee Utd vs Rangers.
Rangers manager Ally McCoist seconds before kick off 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Dundee Utd, Dundee, Rangers, football, Scotland, Ally McCoist, manager, coach
20110910Dundee Utd 3PR 
 Dundee Utd vs Rangers.
Rangers manager Ally McCoist seconds before kick off
..pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Dundee Utd, Dundee, Rangers, football, Scotland, Ally McCoist, manager, coach
20120729Rangers 15PR 
 Brechin City vs Rangers...Rangers first match after the liquidation at the end of the 2011–12 season.
They were relegated to the bottom league of Scottish football.
Background pics of fans leading up to kick off of Rangers first match back.
Fans in the Northern Hotel half way through the 2nd half...chanting abuse at the press ...seconds before I was punched in the face from someone to my right...the crowd cheered.
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2012, Rangers, football, Brechin, Brechin City, Angus, Scotland, Scottish, liquidation, relegation, league, fans

Sport not football (1 file)

Sport and recreation
8877275 
 Liz McColgan in her fitness centre near Carnoustie.

Liz McColgan, MBE (born March 24, 1964) is a former Scottish long distance track and road running athlete.Born Elizabeth Lynch, Liz was brought up in a family of 9 in Dundee where she honed her running skills , she won the gold in the 1991 World Championships in Tokyo, Japan at 10,000 metres, and was voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year. She also won a gold medal in the 1986 Commonwealth Games, and a silver medal in the Seoul Olympics in 1988.

in 1992, the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships were held for the first time and Liz McColgan won the Women's race.

In 1996, she won the London Marathon with a time of 2 hours, 27 minutes and 54 seconds.

Liz McColgan now coaches young athletes in her home town of Dundee. 
 Keywords: liz, mccolgan, champion, runner, olympics, marathon, dundee, carnoustie, championship, commonwealth

Arbroath > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

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