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Transport (14 files)

20140627BubbleCar 1PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 2PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 3PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 4PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 5PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140627BubbleCar 6PR 
 Bubble car being auctioned tomorrow at Taylors Auction Rooms in Montrose
The 1959 BMW Isetta 300 which has only done 14,767 miles has 4 wheels, is right hand drive built under licence in Brighton registration VOY937 and comes complete with a sun roof .
the car is expected to fetch £15000.00 - £20000.00

Pic shows auction room assistant Sophie Sim and the Isetta 300

This Italian-designed Isetta microcar was built under licence in a number of different countries, including Spain, Belgium, France, Brazil, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Produced in the post-World War II years, a time when cheap short-distance transportation was most needed, it became one of the most successful and influential city cars ever created. Because of its egg shape and bubble-like windows, it became known as a ‘bubble car', a name later given to other similar vehicles.
With space for two and their luggage, the Isetta was perfect for the UK's urban and rural roads. In 1957, Isetta of Great Britain began producing 300 models at their factory in Brighton under licence from BMW. The British cars were right-hand drive with the door hinged from the right hand side of the car and the steering column moved across to the right as well. Being right-hand drive meant that the driver and engine were on the same side, so a counterweight was added to the left side to compensate. Lucas electrics replaced the German Hella and Bosch components, with a different headlamp housing being used. Girling brake components replaced the ATE brake parts.
In 1962, Isetta of Great Britain stopped production of the little cars but continued to produce Isetta engines until 1964.
The Isetta ‘Bubble Car' is surely the smallest car BMW will ever make! 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, Angus Pictures, Scotland, Isetta, BMW, car, Taylors Auction Rooms, Montrose, Angus, sale, transport, bubble car
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-1 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson and her son Jon Davidson Oeflein with some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-10 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson and her son Jon Davidson Oeflein waving off some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-11 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson waving off some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid.. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-12 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson waving off some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid.. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-13 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson and her son Jon Davidson Oeflein waving off some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-17 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson and her son Jon Davidson Oeflein with some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-8 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson and her son Jon Davidson Oeflein and Maggie Sherrit waving off some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin
20140827HarleyDavidsonPR-9 
 The granddaughter of one of the founders of Harley-Davidson motorbikes has visited her family’s ancestral home in Angus.

Jean Davidson, 77, travelled from Milwaukee, USA, with her son Jon Davidson Oeflein to pay tribute to her family’s roots at the Davidson Cottage at Aberlemno, near Brechin.

Alexander and Margaret Davidson lived in the modest two-bedroom cottage with their six children and two workers before leaving for Wisconsin in America in 1858 in search of more opportunities.

Pic shows Jean Davidson and her son Jon Davidson Oeflein waving off some of the 100 strong German Harley Davidson enthusiasts who had just popped in to the historic cottage(top centre) as they tour Scotland
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Paul Reid, 2014, Harley Davidson, Brechin

Military (57 files)

Not marines
20130915Kylesku PR-1-2 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-1-3 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the Kylesku bridge...there was no bridge when the x craft left from here on their missin from left to right
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub, bridge
20130915Kylesku PR-1 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-2 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows detail from the memorial
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-3 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows detail on the memorial 
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915Kylesku PR-4 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows wreaths at the memorial after the ceremony
Pic Paul Reid 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Scotland, naval, navy, war, military, sub, mini sub
20130915MiniSub 10aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Lt John Lorimer on board shipe with the crew of the X6 .....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 10bPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows .Lt John Lorimer on board shipo with the the crew of the X6 ....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 10PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the crew of the X6 ...Lt John Lorimer ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 11PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer marrying his wife and Nayvy wren Judith in Ayr two days after receiving his DSO medal at Buckingham Palace...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 12PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer marrying his wife and Nayvy wren Judith in Ayr two days after receiving his DSO medal at Buckingham Palace...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 13PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic press cuttings...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 14PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows press cutting...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 15aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the reverse side of X craft hero John Lorimer's medal gifted to him by the German sailors personel who were on board tirpitz when the ship was attacked by Lorimer and his colleagues ......... Silver medal 1984 Germany Medal in commemoration 1944 Fight in the Arctic Sea. Battlestar Tirpitz ..pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 15PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer's medal gifted to him by the German sailors personel who were on board tirpitz when the ship was attacked by Lorimer and his colleagues ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 16PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows a sketch by Commanding Officer Lt Donald Cameron from Carluke who was given a VC gifted to John Lorimer at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire.
Pic shows the X6 being left behind by the towing submarine before the attack, charging batteries by winding a dyanamo in the dark with the Tirpitz lit up in the background and finally The terpitz(left) with the X6 sub's periscope inthe foreground
...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 17PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows a sketch by Commanding Officer Cameron who was given a VC gifted to John Lorimer at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire.
Pic shows the view on approaching the Tirpitz, the sub crew being captured before the x6 sub sank after dropping their explosives and the explosion 1 hour later....pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 19PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer on board the Trepitz after his arrest ..pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 1aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(91) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 1PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 27PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 28PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 29PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Berigus at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 2PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 30PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model and the japanese cable he cut and kept as proof of success...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 31PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 32PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows Adam Bergius at home in Kintyre with an x craft model...Bergius trained with John Lorimer etc in the Scottish lochs and won a barvery award for his work cutting telecommunications cables in the Mekong Delta river under Japanese ships noses forcing the Japanese to use the airwaves then allowing the Americans to know their moves. ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer, Adam Bergius
20130915MiniSub 3PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 4PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 5PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire with his collection of medals including his DSO medal(left)..Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 6PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(90) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire with his collection of medals including his DSO medal(left)..Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 7PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer's(91) DSO medal.Distinguished Service Order ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 8PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows X craft hero John Lorimer(91) at home in Kirkmichael, Ayrshire...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130915MiniSub 9PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' was one of the most daring and dangerous missions of the Second World War … the attack, on the 22nd September 1943, by 3 midget submarine’s upon the mighty Tirpitz 
Pic shows the crew of the X6 ....LT Wilson- (passage crew commanding officer), commanding officer Lt. Donald Cameron(crew), Lt. John Lorimer(crew), 
Front row Lt. R. Kendall(crew), and Engine Room Artificer Ednund Goddard(crew);Leading Seaman McGregor(passage crew) and Stoker Oxley(passenger crew) ...pic Paul Reid

A ceremony is to be held at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, econd World War, 1943, 3 midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, John Lorimer
20130922Kylesku 100PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 101PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 102PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 103PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 104PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius(left) and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 105PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Stefano Manucci Command Warrant Officer Submarines with X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 106PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Stefano Manucci Command Warrant Officer Submarines with X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Stefano Manucci, Command Warrant Officer, Submarines
20130922Kylesku 107PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors Adam Bergius(left) and John Lorimer at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 108PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the loch next to the memorial where the subs headed out from on their way to Norway 
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 109PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Willie Elliott at the ceremony...Willie witnessed watched as a boy
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Willie Elliott
20130922Kylesku 110PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows Willie Elliott at the ceremony...Willie witnessed watched as a boy
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Willie Elliott
20130922Kylesku 111PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the bridge at Kylesku which wasn't there when the mini-subs headed along from left to right and out to sea and Norway.
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, bridge, road
20130922Kylesku 112PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows X Craft survivors John Lorimer(left) and Adam Bergius at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval, Adam Bergius, XE4, x6, XE24
20130922Kylesku 113aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
Pic shows the last post being played at the ceremony with the loch behind which the mini-subs had headed along on their way to Norway
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 93PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 94PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 95PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 96aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) (2nd from left)at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 96PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 97PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) laying a wreath next to the memorial at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 98aPR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 98PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony after laying a wreath next to the memorial at the ceremony...
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval
20130922Kylesku 99PR 
 X Craft and 'Operation Source' memorial service at Kylesku in Sutherland to commemorate the 70th anniversary of one of the most courageous acts of World War II – the attack by Royal Navy midget submarines on the mighty German battleship, Tirpitz. 
The attack, which took place in a Norwegian fjord on 22 September 1943, was launched from Loch Cairnbawn, in Assynt one of the Scottish Lochs where training took place. 
The Six 50ft midget submarine known as an X Craft were too small for its four crew members to stand up in and were powered by a diesel engine from a London bus, three of the craft made it to their target the Tirpitz was crippled, and was never fully operational again.
X Craft survivor John Lorimer(91) at the ceremony looking out at the loch and route the subs headed from for Norway
Pic Paul Reid. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Operation Source, mission, Second World War, 1943, x craft, midget submarine, Tirpitz, John Lorimer, Norway, German, Germany, navy, Loch Cairnbawn, Norway, fjord, Kylesku, cermony, memorial, Assynt, Scotland, Scottish, service, x sub, navy, war, naval

GV General Views (16 files)

20140515Watson-Watt10PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt11PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott next to his sculpture
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows the Sir Robert Watson-Watt staue at Powderhall Foundry in Edinburgh....pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt13PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after arrival
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt14PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Statue unveiled after being lowered into place
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt15PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt1PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt21PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture
20140515Watson-Watt2PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt3PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin......pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt4PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt6PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt7PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt8PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
Pic shows Alan Heriott in front of his statue
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt9PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2014, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20140515Watson-Watt 20PR 
 Statue by Edinburgh sculptor Alan Herriot of Sir Robert Watson-Watt arrives in Brechin,his home town, this is Brechin's first ever statue.
pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees. 
 Keywords: 2014, Alan Herriot, Angus, Angus Pictures, Brechin, Paul Reid, Robert Watson-Watt, Scotland, Scottish, inventor, meteorologist, meteorology, radar, sculptor, sculpture

GV General Views > Buildings and Urban Views > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arts and Entertainment (17 files)

All aspects of the arts and the entertainment industry
20130429Watson-WattPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 11PR 
 Pic shows St Ninians Square in Brechin where Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt will be situated.

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 13PR 
 Pic shows plaque on the wall of Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 14PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt's birthplace at 5 Union Street, Brechin(right)

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 15PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot.
The sculpture which has just been imortilized in bronze will be Brechin's first ever statue and will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born in 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 2PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 3PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 4PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 5PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 6PR 
 Pic shows detail from Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt 9PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot with his bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt aPR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watson-Watt PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot
20130429Watsotson-Watt 1PR 
 Pic shows Edinburgh Sculptor Alan Herriot's bronze sculpture of Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

Arbroath > New images awaiting classification > Visitor Uploads > Visitor Uploads (1 file)

20130429Watson-Watt12PR 
 Pic shows Robert Watson-Watt

One of the forgotten heroes of the Battle of Britain and widely known as the “Father of Radar” Robert Watson Watt whose revolutionary tracking system helped defeat the Luftwaffe has finally been imortilised in the shape of a fantastic statue by Edinburgh based artist Alan Herriot. Brechin's first ever statue will be erected high on a plinth in the Angus town's St Ninians Square.
Sir Robert Watson-Watt was born at 5 Union Street, Brechin, on April 13, 1892, and was educated at Damacre School and Brechin High School. He graduated with a BSc in Engineering in 1912 from University College, Dundee, which was then part of the University of St Andrews. Following graduation he was offered an assistantship by Professor William Peddie who excited his interest in radio waves.

His work during the Second World War provided the Royal Air Force with early warning radar that allowed the pilots to detect and intercept attacking German aircrafts during the Battle of Britain.
This was a pivotal moment for Britain and Watson-Watt’s contribution was recognized in 1942 with a Knighthood

Some years later Watson-Watt reportedly was stopped while driving in Canada for speeding by a policeman operating a radar gun.Watt commented “Had I known what you were going to do with it I would never have invented it!”
Watt worote a peom about this event in his life....
Pity Sir Robert Watson-Watt, strange target of this radar plot,
And thus, with others I can mention, the victim of his own invention.
His magical all-seeing eye enabled cloud-bound planes to fly,
but now by some ironic twist, it spots the speeding motorist and bites,
no doubt with legal wit, the hand that once created it !

Biographical note:
Robert Alexander Watson-Watt was born in Brechin, Scotland on April 13th 1982. He attended the local high school in Brechin and won a Scholarship to the University College, 
Dundee where he achieved a BSs degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1919 he was awarded a BSc in Physics from the University of London. 
In 1912 he took a position with the government Meteorological Office before transferring to the field observing station at Ditton Park, Slough in 1919. He became Superintendent of the Radio Research Station in 1927. 
In 1935, Watson-Watt discovered that radio waves could be used for detecting aircraft and was credited with the invention of radar. 
From 1952 onwards he lived mainly in the USA and Canada. 
He died December 5th 1973 in Inverness, Scotland. 
Watson-Watt was a Fellow and Treasurer of the Institute of Physics, a Fellow of the Royal Society and the recipient of many honoury degrees.

pic Paul Reid/Angus Pictures 
 Keywords: Angus Pictures, Paul Reid, 2013, Robert Watson-Watt, inventor, Scottish, Scotland, radar, meteorologist, meteorology, Brechin, Angus, sculpture, sculptor, Alan Herriot

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